Disillusioned Obama 2008 donors not giving to 2012 campaign

Thomas Lifson
Where has all the love gone? The Obama campaign must be asking itself why those donors who flocked to its support in 2008 are sitting on their pocketbooks this election cycle. JournOlist member Ben Smith, editor of Buzzfeed, highlights the startling failure of so many Obama donors to reaffirm their support for the Lightbringer this election cycle:

According to a BuzzFeed analysis of campaign finance data, 88% of the people who gave $200 or more in 2008 - 537,806 people - have not yet given that sum this year. And this drop-off isn't simply an artifact of timing. A full 87% of the people who gave $200 - the sum that triggers an itemized report to the Federal Elections Commission - through April of 2008, 182,078 people, had not contributed by the end of last month.

It seems that a lot of Democrats are down in the dumps, disillusioned, depressed, and dismayed by the failure of Obama to deliver on all the wonderful promises to halt the rise of the seas, bring us together, and revive the economy. And this is before the Wisconsin recall vote, which is now anticipated to deal a further body blow to Democrat morale.

Interestingly enough, the disillusioned former donors Buzzfeed interviewed are all critical of Obama's insufficient leftism:

"Where's the change I can believe in?" asked Lisa Pike, a 55-year-old from Williamsburg, Va. with a small medical transcription business who gave $658 in 2008. She said she is not planning on contributing this time around. "I wish he was the socialist they accused him of being. I wish we had the tons of change that would justify the right freaking out. I wish him well - I don't dislike him personally - but I'm disappointed that he's not the change-agent I had hoped for."

Buzzfeed was unable to find any former donors who bought the line that Obama was a centrist racial healer, and are now disillusioned with the Van Jones, Anita Dunn, Valerie Jarrett crew, the heightening of racial tensions, the nationalization of health care, Solyndra et. al., and the takeover of GM and Chrysler.

Where has all the love gone? The Obama campaign must be asking itself why those donors who flocked to its support in 2008 are sitting on their pocketbooks this election cycle. JournOlist member Ben Smith, editor of Buzzfeed, highlights the startling failure of so many Obama donors to reaffirm their support for the Lightbringer this election cycle:

According to a BuzzFeed analysis of campaign finance data, 88% of the people who gave $200 or more in 2008 - 537,806 people - have not yet given that sum this year. And this drop-off isn't simply an artifact of timing. A full 87% of the people who gave $200 - the sum that triggers an itemized report to the Federal Elections Commission - through April of 2008, 182,078 people, had not contributed by the end of last month.

It seems that a lot of Democrats are down in the dumps, disillusioned, depressed, and dismayed by the failure of Obama to deliver on all the wonderful promises to halt the rise of the seas, bring us together, and revive the economy. And this is before the Wisconsin recall vote, which is now anticipated to deal a further body blow to Democrat morale.

Interestingly enough, the disillusioned former donors Buzzfeed interviewed are all critical of Obama's insufficient leftism:

"Where's the change I can believe in?" asked Lisa Pike, a 55-year-old from Williamsburg, Va. with a small medical transcription business who gave $658 in 2008. She said she is not planning on contributing this time around. "I wish he was the socialist they accused him of being. I wish we had the tons of change that would justify the right freaking out. I wish him well - I don't dislike him personally - but I'm disappointed that he's not the change-agent I had hoped for."

Buzzfeed was unable to find any former donors who bought the line that Obama was a centrist racial healer, and are now disillusioned with the Van Jones, Anita Dunn, Valerie Jarrett crew, the heightening of racial tensions, the nationalization of health care, Solyndra et. al., and the takeover of GM and Chrysler.