A movie with Christian heroes fighting atheists

It seems almost a miracle, but a major motion picture is opening nationwide today celebrating Christian resistance to aggressive atheists. For Greater Glory, starring Andy Garcia, has the potential to break out, and reach a wide audience of people normally ignored by Hollywood, perhaps even as Passion of the Christ did.  Monica Showalter of Investor's Business Daily spoke with Andy Gracia about this most remarkable film an d explains the background

The film was originally called "Cristiada," a Spanish reference to a little-known rebellion in western Mexico from 1926 to 1929, where Christians rose up against a socialist secularist government that tried to stomp out religion in the name of "progress."

After peaceful protests failed, Mexico's "Cristeros" formed an army to fight the government in the name of defending their religious freedom. The three-year war cost 56,000 lives, but in the end, the Cristeros mostly prevailed.

Hollywood wouldn't be expected to touch a topic that put Christians in a heroic role.

But that isn't where the film's uniqueness starts: "Many Mexicans have never heard of the Cristiada," Garcia told IBD. The film was made not by Hollywood producers, he said, but by a Mexican producer who wanted to inform his countrymen about their own invisible past.

"It's a fairly taboo topic in Mexico, where the history has been swept under the rug," Garcia said. "They did it because they believed in it."

As for why they did it now: "These things can't be kept on the back burner any longer."

Few Americans have paid much attention to Mexico's Revolution, and the aftermath, which has done so much to determine the state of our southern neighbor today. This is a chance to learn about history that the secualr left who dominate education and culture would prefer to ignore.

It seems almost a miracle, but a major motion picture is opening nationwide today celebrating Christian resistance to aggressive atheists. For Greater Glory, starring Andy Garcia, has the potential to break out, and reach a wide audience of people normally ignored by Hollywood, perhaps even as Passion of the Christ did.  Monica Showalter of Investor's Business Daily spoke with Andy Gracia about this most remarkable film an d explains the background

The film was originally called "Cristiada," a Spanish reference to a little-known rebellion in western Mexico from 1926 to 1929, where Christians rose up against a socialist secularist government that tried to stomp out religion in the name of "progress."

After peaceful protests failed, Mexico's "Cristeros" formed an army to fight the government in the name of defending their religious freedom. The three-year war cost 56,000 lives, but in the end, the Cristeros mostly prevailed.

Hollywood wouldn't be expected to touch a topic that put Christians in a heroic role.

But that isn't where the film's uniqueness starts: "Many Mexicans have never heard of the Cristiada," Garcia told IBD. The film was made not by Hollywood producers, he said, but by a Mexican producer who wanted to inform his countrymen about their own invisible past.

"It's a fairly taboo topic in Mexico, where the history has been swept under the rug," Garcia said. "They did it because they believed in it."

As for why they did it now: "These things can't be kept on the back burner any longer."

Few Americans have paid much attention to Mexico's Revolution, and the aftermath, which has done so much to determine the state of our southern neighbor today. This is a chance to learn about history that the secualr left who dominate education and culture would prefer to ignore.

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