Three NATO protestors held in terror plot

Rick Moran
The protestors claim that what the cops thought was equipment to make Molotov cocktails was actually a "home beer brewing operation."

Which side do you think is stupid?


MSNBC:

Their attorney, Sarah Gelsomino, told AP the men were "absolutely in shock and have no idea where these charges are coming from." 

"The National Lawyers Guild deplores the charges against Occupy activists in the strongest degree,"  Gelsomino said in a statement decrying the charges. "It's outrageous for the city to apply terrorism charges when it's the police who have been terrorizing activists and threatening their right to protest."

Six others initially arrested have been released. They were all detained in a raid Wednesday on a home in Bridgeport on Chicago's South Side, NBCChicago.com reported.

Beer or bombs?
But the group of protesters said what police thought was suspicious was actually a home beer-brewing operation.

"We were handcuffed to a bench and our legs were shackled together. We were not told what was happening," one of those detained but later released, Darrin Ammussek, told the station.

"I believe very strongly in non-violence, and if I had seen anything that even resembled any plans or anything like that, we wouldn't have been there," he added.

He claimed that during 18 hours in custody, police never told him why he was arrested, read him his rights or allowed him to make a phone call, The Associated Pres reported. He said he remained handcuffed to a bench, even after asking to use a restroom. 

"There were guards walking by making statements into the door along the lines of 'hippie,' 'communist," 'pinko,'" a tired-looking Annussek told reporters just after his release.

First, I wouldn't put it past the Chicago police to gin up charges against activists. Next to New Orleans, Chicago has perhaps the most corrupt police department in the US and gaining publicity for taking down a terrorist cell in advance of the summit insulates the department from criticism somewhat if violence is sparked during the protests.They can always point to these arrests and claim due dilligence despite the violence.

At the same time, I doubt that the police don't know the difference between equipment for beer brewing and bomb making. The three who remain in custody might know more about making incendiary devices than brewing beer.

Protestors always claim they are innocent - until the riots and destruction begin. Then, it's the cops fault that fires are set, windows smashed, graffitti painted, and bombs explode. The protestors are just innocent bystanders, or the violence is the fault of a few radicals.

But no matter how much protest organizers speak of non-violence, the fact is, they enable the mayhem with their violent rhetoric toward police. Blaming cops for doing their jobs in trying to ensure the safety of people and property only encourages those with violent motives to act.

The protestors claim that what the cops thought was equipment to make Molotov cocktails was actually a "home beer brewing operation."

Which side do you think is stupid?


MSNBC:

Their attorney, Sarah Gelsomino, told AP the men were "absolutely in shock and have no idea where these charges are coming from." 

"The National Lawyers Guild deplores the charges against Occupy activists in the strongest degree,"  Gelsomino said in a statement decrying the charges. "It's outrageous for the city to apply terrorism charges when it's the police who have been terrorizing activists and threatening their right to protest."

Six others initially arrested have been released. They were all detained in a raid Wednesday on a home in Bridgeport on Chicago's South Side, NBCChicago.com reported.

Beer or bombs?
But the group of protesters said what police thought was suspicious was actually a home beer-brewing operation.

"We were handcuffed to a bench and our legs were shackled together. We were not told what was happening," one of those detained but later released, Darrin Ammussek, told the station.

"I believe very strongly in non-violence, and if I had seen anything that even resembled any plans or anything like that, we wouldn't have been there," he added.

He claimed that during 18 hours in custody, police never told him why he was arrested, read him his rights or allowed him to make a phone call, The Associated Pres reported. He said he remained handcuffed to a bench, even after asking to use a restroom. 

"There were guards walking by making statements into the door along the lines of 'hippie,' 'communist," 'pinko,'" a tired-looking Annussek told reporters just after his release.

First, I wouldn't put it past the Chicago police to gin up charges against activists. Next to New Orleans, Chicago has perhaps the most corrupt police department in the US and gaining publicity for taking down a terrorist cell in advance of the summit insulates the department from criticism somewhat if violence is sparked during the protests.They can always point to these arrests and claim due dilligence despite the violence.

At the same time, I doubt that the police don't know the difference between equipment for beer brewing and bomb making. The three who remain in custody might know more about making incendiary devices than brewing beer.

Protestors always claim they are innocent - until the riots and destruction begin. Then, it's the cops fault that fires are set, windows smashed, graffitti painted, and bombs explode. The protestors are just innocent bystanders, or the violence is the fault of a few radicals.

But no matter how much protest organizers speak of non-violence, the fact is, they enable the mayhem with their violent rhetoric toward police. Blaming cops for doing their jobs in trying to ensure the safety of people and property only encourages those with violent motives to act.