The Bain Saga Continues

There will probably be no end to the Bain attacks on Romney until President Obama, admits to himself that they are not only failing but backfiring. And, if experience teaches, that is an unlikely eventuality given the arrogance and self-absorption he has thus far displayed.  Hence, there, too, will be no end to the controversy about them. 

Lucianne's Link Lady scores a perfect ten in her comment (on the Must Reads section) to a link to a recent interview by Anderson Cooper (of all people) and Ben LaBolt, an Obama campaign spokesman, who is unable to answer questions about Obama's (Bain) attacks.

Your Start-The-Week-With-A-Kool-Aid-Guzzle Video...Give Anderson Cooper credit. Maybe asking these questions is a trend?

The interview is here (caution-You Tube autoplays), and the transcript is here.  Money exchange:

COOPER: Private equity is about wealth creation for investors. And I know that's not what he's saying, but that's what it is about. But I don't understand why it's OK for the president's private equity supporters to bankrupt companies and put people out of work, but it's not OK for Mitt Romney's equity firm to do that.

LABOLT: The president has support from business leaders across industries who agree with his vision of building an economy that's built to last, where hard work and responsibility are rewarded, where everybody from Main Street to Wall Street plays...

(CROSSTALK)

COOPER: You yourself said that's not what private equity is about, and yet the president is accepting money from private equity firms. Isn't that hypocritical?

As Cooper and others make clear the hypocrisy makes for a muddled message, and those who have drunk the Kool-Aid suffer to explain why they have, and their fate isn't death but embarrassment.

Holman Jenkins covers the esoteric nature of some of the ads and the dissention and confusion within the ranks they are causing here:

Who says Wall Streeters aren't filled with a desire to please? Two big-name Democratic financiers, Roger Altman and Steven Rattner, may not be ready to defend the president's deceitful Bain ads. But they promptly took to the airwaves to defend the president's defense of the ads, after President Obama himself issued a few syllables they could cling to, saying the ads merely questioned whether profit maximization is an appropriate governing principle.

Which of course has nothing to do with anything. It certainly has nothing to do with the Bain ads. The ads aren't meant to engage viewers in a discussion of the limits of the profit motive. The ads are about pure ressentiment.

The word is French and was once adopted by philosophers as diverse as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Weber. It describes a kind of moral scapegoating of others to explain our disappointments and dissatisfactions.

and later:

Here's the real message of the Bain ads. The ads may invoke classic private-equity slurs like looter and stripper, but the real message is that private equity is exactly what it says it is: a bringer of efficiency and rationalization.

Anne Torres, Cory Booker's communications director since August 2010, seems to fallen on her sward as collateral damage in the affair:

Though she denied the resignation was tied to the mayor's comments, three city officials with knowledge of personnel decisions said Torres was forced out and made the scapegoat for the mayor's gaffe.

She probably isn't the last to fall.

At Hugh Hewitt's blog, Clark Judge thinks the attacks are delusionary:

The Obama campaign's attack on Mitt Romney's role starting up Bain Capital may go down as one of the worst political misjudgments of recent decades. It is based on an anachronism -- a picture of an America that hasn't existed in decades, if it ever did....like most Hollywood scripts these charges are heavy on fantasy. We all know what is wrong with them, both in specifics and concept.

And Stephanie Cutter is aghast that David Brooks' well-known admiration of the crease in Obama's trousers has faded ( that admiration is wonderfully dissected here by our friend, Allah).

Cutter is upset at both Brooks and Democratic commentators quoting Brooks.  (There seems to be no transcript available to get the full context, but the frustration in her voice is palpable---after all, if you've lost David Brooks....).

Memorial Day is gone, Summer is nigh, and the fun will continue

There will probably be no end to the Bain attacks on Romney until President Obama, admits to himself that they are not only failing but backfiring. And, if experience teaches, that is an unlikely eventuality given the arrogance and self-absorption he has thus far displayed.  Hence, there, too, will be no end to the controversy about them. 

Lucianne's Link Lady scores a perfect ten in her comment (on the Must Reads section) to a link to a recent interview by Anderson Cooper (of all people) and Ben LaBolt, an Obama campaign spokesman, who is unable to answer questions about Obama's (Bain) attacks.

Your Start-The-Week-With-A-Kool-Aid-Guzzle Video...Give Anderson Cooper credit. Maybe asking these questions is a trend?

The interview is here (caution-You Tube autoplays), and the transcript is here.  Money exchange:

COOPER: Private equity is about wealth creation for investors. And I know that's not what he's saying, but that's what it is about. But I don't understand why it's OK for the president's private equity supporters to bankrupt companies and put people out of work, but it's not OK for Mitt Romney's equity firm to do that.

LABOLT: The president has support from business leaders across industries who agree with his vision of building an economy that's built to last, where hard work and responsibility are rewarded, where everybody from Main Street to Wall Street plays...

(CROSSTALK)

COOPER: You yourself said that's not what private equity is about, and yet the president is accepting money from private equity firms. Isn't that hypocritical?

As Cooper and others make clear the hypocrisy makes for a muddled message, and those who have drunk the Kool-Aid suffer to explain why they have, and their fate isn't death but embarrassment.

Holman Jenkins covers the esoteric nature of some of the ads and the dissention and confusion within the ranks they are causing here:

Who says Wall Streeters aren't filled with a desire to please? Two big-name Democratic financiers, Roger Altman and Steven Rattner, may not be ready to defend the president's deceitful Bain ads. But they promptly took to the airwaves to defend the president's defense of the ads, after President Obama himself issued a few syllables they could cling to, saying the ads merely questioned whether profit maximization is an appropriate governing principle.

Which of course has nothing to do with anything. It certainly has nothing to do with the Bain ads. The ads aren't meant to engage viewers in a discussion of the limits of the profit motive. The ads are about pure ressentiment.

The word is French and was once adopted by philosophers as diverse as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Weber. It describes a kind of moral scapegoating of others to explain our disappointments and dissatisfactions.

and later:

Here's the real message of the Bain ads. The ads may invoke classic private-equity slurs like looter and stripper, but the real message is that private equity is exactly what it says it is: a bringer of efficiency and rationalization.

Anne Torres, Cory Booker's communications director since August 2010, seems to fallen on her sward as collateral damage in the affair:

Though she denied the resignation was tied to the mayor's comments, three city officials with knowledge of personnel decisions said Torres was forced out and made the scapegoat for the mayor's gaffe.

She probably isn't the last to fall.

At Hugh Hewitt's blog, Clark Judge thinks the attacks are delusionary:

The Obama campaign's attack on Mitt Romney's role starting up Bain Capital may go down as one of the worst political misjudgments of recent decades. It is based on an anachronism -- a picture of an America that hasn't existed in decades, if it ever did....like most Hollywood scripts these charges are heavy on fantasy. We all know what is wrong with them, both in specifics and concept.

And Stephanie Cutter is aghast that David Brooks' well-known admiration of the crease in Obama's trousers has faded ( that admiration is wonderfully dissected here by our friend, Allah).

Cutter is upset at both Brooks and Democratic commentators quoting Brooks.  (There seems to be no transcript available to get the full context, but the frustration in her voice is palpable---after all, if you've lost David Brooks....).

Memorial Day is gone, Summer is nigh, and the fun will continue

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