Romney fundraising keeping pace with Obama

Rick Moran
Considering the fact that Romney raised less than $13 million in March, the news that his fundraising efforts in April nearly matched the president's totals is something of a welcome surprise.

New York Times:

Mitt Romney almost matched President Obama in fund-raising during April after securing his party's presidential nomination and joining forces with the Republican National Committee, the campaign will announce on Thursday.

Mr. Romney and the R.N.C. raised $40.1 million in April, just shy of the $43.6 million that Mr. Obama and the Democratic National Committee raised for the month.

The contributions on behalf of Mr. Romney represent a huge jump over the $12.6 million that his campaign raised in March. The increase was made possible by donors coalescing around Mr. Romney as the nominee and the larger donations that can be directed to the party, campaign officials said.

"Voters are tired of President Obama's broken promises," said Reince Priebus, the chairman of the R.N.C. in a statement. "Mitt Romney has the record and plan to turn our country around - that is why he is receiving such enthusiastic support from voters across the country."

Aides to Mr. Romney noted that the total might have been even higher if the joint fund-raising effort - known as the "Victory" campaign - had begun sooner. The campaign and the R.N.C. announced they were joining forces on April 4 but did not hold the first combined event until April 14, nearly halfway through the month.

The president still has far more cash on hand than Romney, but Obama's advantage is at least partially offset by the conservative Super Pacs who have already spent more than $100 million to defeat the president.

What's needed now by Romney is a super charged effort to attempt to match Obama in the field. The Democratic ground game has had a full quarter to get organized and they aren't wasting anytime in swing states in opening field offices and hiring staff, as well as gathering volunteers. The good news is that there is still plenty of time to put together a quality organization that can challenge the Obama campaign everywhere.

With every vote important - especially in states like Virginia, North Carolina, and Nevada - having a superior ground game is likely to spell the difference between victory and defeat.



Considering the fact that Romney raised less than $13 million in March, the news that his fundraising efforts in April nearly matched the president's totals is something of a welcome surprise.

New York Times:

Mitt Romney almost matched President Obama in fund-raising during April after securing his party's presidential nomination and joining forces with the Republican National Committee, the campaign will announce on Thursday.

Mr. Romney and the R.N.C. raised $40.1 million in April, just shy of the $43.6 million that Mr. Obama and the Democratic National Committee raised for the month.

The contributions on behalf of Mr. Romney represent a huge jump over the $12.6 million that his campaign raised in March. The increase was made possible by donors coalescing around Mr. Romney as the nominee and the larger donations that can be directed to the party, campaign officials said.

"Voters are tired of President Obama's broken promises," said Reince Priebus, the chairman of the R.N.C. in a statement. "Mitt Romney has the record and plan to turn our country around - that is why he is receiving such enthusiastic support from voters across the country."

Aides to Mr. Romney noted that the total might have been even higher if the joint fund-raising effort - known as the "Victory" campaign - had begun sooner. The campaign and the R.N.C. announced they were joining forces on April 4 but did not hold the first combined event until April 14, nearly halfway through the month.

The president still has far more cash on hand than Romney, but Obama's advantage is at least partially offset by the conservative Super Pacs who have already spent more than $100 million to defeat the president.

What's needed now by Romney is a super charged effort to attempt to match Obama in the field. The Democratic ground game has had a full quarter to get organized and they aren't wasting anytime in swing states in opening field offices and hiring staff, as well as gathering volunteers. The good news is that there is still plenty of time to put together a quality organization that can challenge the Obama campaign everywhere.

With every vote important - especially in states like Virginia, North Carolina, and Nevada - having a superior ground game is likely to spell the difference between victory and defeat.