'NATO 3' plotted to firebomb Obama campaign headquarters

Rick Moran
I know that yesterday, I questioned the motives of Chicago police in arresting 3 anti-NATO activists in Chicago for domestic terrorism.

I need to apologize for my error.

What prosecutors unveiled in court yesterday during the suspect's arraignment seems concrete and believable.

Sun Times:

Undercover Chicago Police officers who infiltrated the group were with the suspects when they allegedly made Molotov cocktails -- bottles filled with flammable liquid that are used as firebombs, sources said.

After raiding the apartment Wednesday, police said they found written plans for assembling pipe bombs and confiscated a mortar gun, swords, a crossbow, a throwing star, ninja knives and blades with brass knuckles, too.

Law enforcement officials said they asked a judge for a "no-knock" search warrant because the protesters were getting ready to put the explosive devices into a car and move them to another location.

Police feared they might lose track of the weapons and firebombs if they didn't move in late Wednesday.

One of the alleged conspirators had warned that Chicago "doesn't know what it's in for" and promised "the city will never be the same" after they unleashed their wrath, prosecutors said in court.

On Saturday, the men were charged in Cook County Criminal Court with possession of an explosive or incendiary device, conspiracy to commit terrorism and providing material support to terrorism.

It's the first time anyone has been charged in Illinois with the state anti-terrorism law passed in the wake of the 9/11 attacks, officials said.

Sigman says she never saw even a hint that her roomies were anything but peaceful demonstrators.

"I don't know, man. I have no idea. They confiscated my guitar, too," the 22-year-old said. "I was in court [Saturday] and my jaw dropped when I heard the charges. It was completely odd. The opposite of everything that I had felt and seen and done in the apartment."

The lawyers for the accused are claiming a set up by the undercover officers. The problem with that line of defense is that there are recordings made by the police that apparently confirm their side of the story.

And despite the lawyers denying the suspects are anarchists, one of the accused's own father says he got mixed up with the anarchists.

The only thing that bothers me is that the 3 undercover officers would get so lucky as to infiltrate a group of protestors where this plot was hatched. Either the police or FBI knew something about these three where they needed to keep an eye on them, or there were many infiltrations by undercover cops at many of these safe houses.


I know that yesterday, I questioned the motives of Chicago police in arresting 3 anti-NATO activists in Chicago for domestic terrorism.

I need to apologize for my error.

What prosecutors unveiled in court yesterday during the suspect's arraignment seems concrete and believable.

Sun Times:

Undercover Chicago Police officers who infiltrated the group were with the suspects when they allegedly made Molotov cocktails -- bottles filled with flammable liquid that are used as firebombs, sources said.

After raiding the apartment Wednesday, police said they found written plans for assembling pipe bombs and confiscated a mortar gun, swords, a crossbow, a throwing star, ninja knives and blades with brass knuckles, too.

Law enforcement officials said they asked a judge for a "no-knock" search warrant because the protesters were getting ready to put the explosive devices into a car and move them to another location.

Police feared they might lose track of the weapons and firebombs if they didn't move in late Wednesday.

One of the alleged conspirators had warned that Chicago "doesn't know what it's in for" and promised "the city will never be the same" after they unleashed their wrath, prosecutors said in court.

On Saturday, the men were charged in Cook County Criminal Court with possession of an explosive or incendiary device, conspiracy to commit terrorism and providing material support to terrorism.

It's the first time anyone has been charged in Illinois with the state anti-terrorism law passed in the wake of the 9/11 attacks, officials said.

Sigman says she never saw even a hint that her roomies were anything but peaceful demonstrators.

"I don't know, man. I have no idea. They confiscated my guitar, too," the 22-year-old said. "I was in court [Saturday] and my jaw dropped when I heard the charges. It was completely odd. The opposite of everything that I had felt and seen and done in the apartment."

The lawyers for the accused are claiming a set up by the undercover officers. The problem with that line of defense is that there are recordings made by the police that apparently confirm their side of the story.

And despite the lawyers denying the suspects are anarchists, one of the accused's own father says he got mixed up with the anarchists.

The only thing that bothers me is that the 3 undercover officers would get so lucky as to infiltrate a group of protestors where this plot was hatched. Either the police or FBI knew something about these three where they needed to keep an eye on them, or there were many infiltrations by undercover cops at many of these safe houses.