The Obamacare decision will play into the class warfare campaign

Chad Stafko
The nation's capitol remains a buzz after last week's oral arguments in the Department of Health and Human Services v. Florida, also known as the Supreme Court battle over the legality/illegality of ObamaCare. While we wait with bated breath for the Court's ruling, expected in late June, regardless of the decision, it will launch an epic class-warfare effort by the Obama reelection campaign ahead of the November election.

Suppose the law is upheld in its entirety, a frightening thought indeed, but a possibility nonetheless. President Obama has already, in a rather rare move by a sitting president, begun lobbying the Supreme Court via a recent press conference that any basis for overturning his law would be "unprecedented".

President Obama, if the law is upheld, can and will then claim that the ruling is a victory for the "have-nots", "disadvantaged", and "poor" of this nation. He will paint himself as the champion of these people versus his ultra-wealthy and likely GOP foe, Mitt Romney.

More importantly, a ruling upholding ObamaCare would validate Obama's already massive expansion of government powers and perhaps justify the growth in the size of the federal government since Obama took office. The Court's ruling on the case, if it were to be upheld, while not justifying the necessity or wisdom of the law, could be spun in that way by the Obama campaign.

Furthermore, it could be seen and most certainly would be spun into a message that the Supreme Court approves of the federal government involving itself to a greater degree in the lives of Americans. That may very well be appealing to the growing number of Americans who were already or who have become dependent on the federal government under Obama. Obama may then exploit this group by running a campaign on more government intervention into the economy and the day-to-day lives of the citizens.

Many of us may find it hard to fathom that such a class-warfare platform, that is one based upon the further expansion of government, would appeal to a large segment of the electorate. But, bear in mind that not only have we seen an increase in those who are dependent on the government during Obama's reign, with unemployment and underemployment rates higher since Obama took office, but we also only have about ½ of all Americans who pay income taxes-taxes which help to fund the myriad of federal government programs. Therefore, a tax and spend message may be inviting to this part of the population who are not impacted by the necessary increase in taxes that would accompany ObamaCare.

Let's say, however, that ObamaCare is struck down in its entirety, again a distinct possibility. Obama could and no doubt would use this result to ramp up his class-warfare message in the campaign.

The obvious starting point for Obama would be to characterize the Court as conservative extremists. Obama could label them as enemies of the poor and absent of compassion and then tie the Court with the ultra-wealthy Romney.

Should the Court overturn ObamaCare on a 5-4 decision, across ideological lines, it would provide a springboard in which Obama could attack the integrity of the Court and labeling it as losing its objectivity or credibility with the masses. Obama could simply craft a message that extreme conservatives have hijacked the Court from ordinary Americans.

Such a message could play quite well. The Supreme Court, as opposed to the House & Senate, along with the Presidency, is certainly held to higher regard in relation to integrity and independence. Therefore, such a crafting of the potential 5-4 decision, could be appealing to the independent voters who, arguably, want a more divided Court to a greater degree than do liberals or conservatives.

Regardless of the decision that comes down in late June, President Obama will no doubt use the decision as an opportunity to cultivate deep class-warfare divisions ahead of the election. He will attempt to label an overturning of ObamaCare as an attack on the have-nots, including the poor, unemployed, and underemployed. If the law is upheld, he will portray it as a mandate for further government expansion. Either way, Obama is no doubt looking forward to the ruling and how it will shape his reelection message.

Chad Stafko is a writer and political consultant living in the Midwest. He can be reached at stafko@msn.com


The nation's capitol remains a buzz after last week's oral arguments in the Department of Health and Human Services v. Florida, also known as the Supreme Court battle over the legality/illegality of ObamaCare. While we wait with bated breath for the Court's ruling, expected in late June, regardless of the decision, it will launch an epic class-warfare effort by the Obama reelection campaign ahead of the November election.

Suppose the law is upheld in its entirety, a frightening thought indeed, but a possibility nonetheless. President Obama has already, in a rather rare move by a sitting president, begun lobbying the Supreme Court via a recent press conference that any basis for overturning his law would be "unprecedented".

President Obama, if the law is upheld, can and will then claim that the ruling is a victory for the "have-nots", "disadvantaged", and "poor" of this nation. He will paint himself as the champion of these people versus his ultra-wealthy and likely GOP foe, Mitt Romney.

More importantly, a ruling upholding ObamaCare would validate Obama's already massive expansion of government powers and perhaps justify the growth in the size of the federal government since Obama took office. The Court's ruling on the case, if it were to be upheld, while not justifying the necessity or wisdom of the law, could be spun in that way by the Obama campaign.

Furthermore, it could be seen and most certainly would be spun into a message that the Supreme Court approves of the federal government involving itself to a greater degree in the lives of Americans. That may very well be appealing to the growing number of Americans who were already or who have become dependent on the federal government under Obama. Obama may then exploit this group by running a campaign on more government intervention into the economy and the day-to-day lives of the citizens.

Many of us may find it hard to fathom that such a class-warfare platform, that is one based upon the further expansion of government, would appeal to a large segment of the electorate. But, bear in mind that not only have we seen an increase in those who are dependent on the government during Obama's reign, with unemployment and underemployment rates higher since Obama took office, but we also only have about ½ of all Americans who pay income taxes-taxes which help to fund the myriad of federal government programs. Therefore, a tax and spend message may be inviting to this part of the population who are not impacted by the necessary increase in taxes that would accompany ObamaCare.

Let's say, however, that ObamaCare is struck down in its entirety, again a distinct possibility. Obama could and no doubt would use this result to ramp up his class-warfare message in the campaign.

The obvious starting point for Obama would be to characterize the Court as conservative extremists. Obama could label them as enemies of the poor and absent of compassion and then tie the Court with the ultra-wealthy Romney.

Should the Court overturn ObamaCare on a 5-4 decision, across ideological lines, it would provide a springboard in which Obama could attack the integrity of the Court and labeling it as losing its objectivity or credibility with the masses. Obama could simply craft a message that extreme conservatives have hijacked the Court from ordinary Americans.

Such a message could play quite well. The Supreme Court, as opposed to the House & Senate, along with the Presidency, is certainly held to higher regard in relation to integrity and independence. Therefore, such a crafting of the potential 5-4 decision, could be appealing to the independent voters who, arguably, want a more divided Court to a greater degree than do liberals or conservatives.

Regardless of the decision that comes down in late June, President Obama will no doubt use the decision as an opportunity to cultivate deep class-warfare divisions ahead of the election. He will attempt to label an overturning of ObamaCare as an attack on the have-nots, including the poor, unemployed, and underemployed. If the law is upheld, he will portray it as a mandate for further government expansion. Either way, Obama is no doubt looking forward to the ruling and how it will shape his reelection message.

Chad Stafko is a writer and political consultant living in the Midwest. He can be reached at stafko@msn.com