Some More Obama Dog Observations

Jack Cashill
In wake of the revelation that Barack Obama eats dogs, I thought it might be useful to re-interpret some other passages from the two books he is alleged to have written.

In Dreams from My Father, Obama talks about having "a big yellow dog with a baleful howl" in his backyard.  Recall that it was "away from the dinner table" that Obama "was introduced to dog meat." If I were that dog, I would have been baleful too.

"We got off in Ndori," writes Obama of his Kenyan experience, "and spent the next two hours sipping on warm sodas and watching stray dogs snap at each other in the dust." It doesn't say so in the book, but I presume Obama was just building up an appetite.

In Audacity of Hope, Obama tells of his first visit to the home of his future in-laws, "All that was missing was the dog," he laments.  Apparently, his reputation preceded him.

Also in Audacity, Obama recounts a conversation with daughter Malia:

"Daddy, I have a question."

"Shoot."

"Can we get a dog?"

In the edited version, Obama answers, "What does your mother say?" In my apocryphal unedited version, Obama says, "No, honey, I've sworn off them for Lent."

Not surprisingly, Bill Ayers is also obsessed with dogs.  He makes twenty separate references to dogs in his memoir, Fugitive Days, including this curious admission.  "One day we passed out thousands of leaflets advertising a demonstration . . . in which we would burn a dog to death with napalm in protest of the war."  Of course, he was bluffing.  The killing he and his pals would reserve for humans.

In wake of the revelation that Barack Obama eats dogs, I thought it might be useful to re-interpret some other passages from the two books he is alleged to have written.

In Dreams from My Father, Obama talks about having "a big yellow dog with a baleful howl" in his backyard.  Recall that it was "away from the dinner table" that Obama "was introduced to dog meat." If I were that dog, I would have been baleful too.

"We got off in Ndori," writes Obama of his Kenyan experience, "and spent the next two hours sipping on warm sodas and watching stray dogs snap at each other in the dust." It doesn't say so in the book, but I presume Obama was just building up an appetite.

In Audacity of Hope, Obama tells of his first visit to the home of his future in-laws, "All that was missing was the dog," he laments.  Apparently, his reputation preceded him.

Also in Audacity, Obama recounts a conversation with daughter Malia:

"Daddy, I have a question."

"Shoot."

"Can we get a dog?"

In the edited version, Obama answers, "What does your mother say?" In my apocryphal unedited version, Obama says, "No, honey, I've sworn off them for Lent."

Not surprisingly, Bill Ayers is also obsessed with dogs.  He makes twenty separate references to dogs in his memoir, Fugitive Days, including this curious admission.  "One day we passed out thousands of leaflets advertising a demonstration . . . in which we would burn a dog to death with napalm in protest of the war."  Of course, he was bluffing.  The killing he and his pals would reserve for humans.