Santorum huddles with supporters while Rubio urges him to quit

Rick Moran
The latest numbers coming out of Pennsylvania as well as rising calls for him to retire from the race has Rick Santorum huddling with key conservatives to try and figure out a way to remain a viable candidate.

Politico:

Rick Santorum huddled in Virginia Thursday with a group of longtime conservative activists in what several participants described as a late attempt to rally the right and block Mitt Romney's nomination from becoming inevitable.

The former Pennsylvania senator met in Tysons Corner with a crew of GOP fixtures, led by Reagan-era activists Richard Viguerie and Rebecca Hagelin, to discuss a path forward in the presidential race. The Santorum campaign confirmed that the activists had reached out to request time with him.

fter losing the Wisconsin, Maryland and Washington D.C. primaries this week, Santorum has been battling calls for him to withdraw from the race. The group he met with today includes a number of hard-line ideological stalwarts who remain committed to stopping Romney, however quixotic that mission is becoming.


Former Family Research Council chief Gary Bauer, who was present at the sit-down with Santorum, called it a "strategy meeting to discuss how Sen. Santorum prevails."

"I would say the consensus in the room is, we continue to believe that Sen. Santorum has the best message that is most likely in November to be a winning message," said Bauer, who ran for president himself in 2000. "And so because of that, we want to make sure that we're doing all the things that need to be done so that he will be successful."

The group promises big changes in the Santorum campaign over the next week, but one wonders why the effort is being made when conservative stalwarts like Senator Marco Rubio are urging Santorum to quit:

Rubio has openly endorsed Governor Mitt Romney in the race and has said that he was not one to tell another candidate to drop out of a race- until now.

"I actually think we're going to have a very good nominee. I think Mitt Romney's going to be the next president of the United States. And by their own admission, the folks running against Mitt Romney have admitted that they cannot win the primary, that the only way they can win is a floor fight at the convention, which I think would set us back in terms of our goal of replacing Barack Obama.

"So I do believe it's time now to concede that Mitt Romney has won the Republican nomination, that he's going to be the Republican nominee, and that if we all get behind him he will be the next president of the United States."

Romney is not being helped by having to compete in some of these primaries rather than being allowed to coast. There is always a lag time between running an organization to win primaries and setting up a national campaign and Romney could use the time between now and the convention to organize as best he can to meet the awesome challenge of Obama's money machine.

The longer the primaries are competitive, the longer it will take to switch gears and build a winning organization for the fall.






The latest numbers coming out of Pennsylvania as well as rising calls for him to retire from the race has Rick Santorum huddling with key conservatives to try and figure out a way to remain a viable candidate.

Politico:

Rick Santorum huddled in Virginia Thursday with a group of longtime conservative activists in what several participants described as a late attempt to rally the right and block Mitt Romney's nomination from becoming inevitable.

The former Pennsylvania senator met in Tysons Corner with a crew of GOP fixtures, led by Reagan-era activists Richard Viguerie and Rebecca Hagelin, to discuss a path forward in the presidential race. The Santorum campaign confirmed that the activists had reached out to request time with him.

fter losing the Wisconsin, Maryland and Washington D.C. primaries this week, Santorum has been battling calls for him to withdraw from the race. The group he met with today includes a number of hard-line ideological stalwarts who remain committed to stopping Romney, however quixotic that mission is becoming.


Former Family Research Council chief Gary Bauer, who was present at the sit-down with Santorum, called it a "strategy meeting to discuss how Sen. Santorum prevails."

"I would say the consensus in the room is, we continue to believe that Sen. Santorum has the best message that is most likely in November to be a winning message," said Bauer, who ran for president himself in 2000. "And so because of that, we want to make sure that we're doing all the things that need to be done so that he will be successful."

The group promises big changes in the Santorum campaign over the next week, but one wonders why the effort is being made when conservative stalwarts like Senator Marco Rubio are urging Santorum to quit:

Rubio has openly endorsed Governor Mitt Romney in the race and has said that he was not one to tell another candidate to drop out of a race- until now.

"I actually think we're going to have a very good nominee. I think Mitt Romney's going to be the next president of the United States. And by their own admission, the folks running against Mitt Romney have admitted that they cannot win the primary, that the only way they can win is a floor fight at the convention, which I think would set us back in terms of our goal of replacing Barack Obama.

"So I do believe it's time now to concede that Mitt Romney has won the Republican nomination, that he's going to be the Republican nominee, and that if we all get behind him he will be the next president of the United States."

Romney is not being helped by having to compete in some of these primaries rather than being allowed to coast. There is always a lag time between running an organization to win primaries and setting up a national campaign and Romney could use the time between now and the convention to organize as best he can to meet the awesome challenge of Obama's money machine.

The longer the primaries are competitive, the longer it will take to switch gears and build a winning organization for the fall.