Dems continue attacks on Ann Romney

The Democratic Party's attacks on Ann Romney are still the gift that keeps on giving.

Breitbart's Big Government website reports that U.S. House member from Florida, Scott Randolph, has attacked Mrs. Romney on his Twitter page. Here is what he said:

"How many house servants did stay-at-home-mom Ann Romney had [sic] to raise her kids. Just b/c (because) u don't have job make u a stay-at-home mom."

Randolph continued on a tirade that has thus far lasted a full day. 

As we reported yesterday, the President is tanking in the polls and all of the areas which women cite as their main concerns are the areas in which Obama receives the worst marks.

Apparently Rep. Randolph hasn't been reading the accounts of the early years of the Romneys' marriage where they had no money for hired help. But I have to congratulate Scott Randolph for doing his part to maximize the chances of swing state Florida going into the Republican column in November.

Wikipedia reports that Randolph "is married to the former Susannah Lindberg, a former community organizer and public interest activist who previously served on the staff of former U.S. Congressman Alan Grayson (D-FL) of Florida's 8th congressional district, to include serving as the congressman's campaign manager during Grayson's unsuccessful 2010 reelection campaign." This is doubly amusing because before looking at his mini-biography online, I sarcastically asked myself whether Randolph was taking political advice from the blowhard former Florida Congressman Alan Grayson. No, he is just intimately involved with Grayson's campaign manager.

A major source of the current feminist-Democrat concept that being a stay at home mom is worthy of derision and something women should aspire to transcend dates largely from the widespread influence of Betty Friedan's iconic 1963 book "The Feminine Mystique." In that tome, Friedan described marriage as a "comfortable concentration camp." Let's examine Ms. Friedan's own "concentration camp" with the help of Daniel J. Flynn, author of Intellectual Morons (2004). On pages 218-219, in chapter 12 ("Comfortable Concentration Camp"), Flynn quotes and paraphrases her biographer Daniel Horowitz (Betty Friedan and the Making of the Feminine Mystique) and states:

Central to the appeal of The Feminine Mystique was the idea that Friedan wrote from experience...

According to Horowitz, "a maid cleaned the house, a nurse took care of the children when they were young, and on special occasions a man served as chauffeur and butler."

She experienced some of the same benefits when she married Carl Friedan, an advertising executive who earned a large income...In 1957, the Friedans moved into not-so-Spartan living quarters overlooking the Hudson River. The mansion they inhabited... 'had eleven rooms, three bathrooms, and many elegant details such as marble fireplaces (that's plural fireplaces), French doors and arched windows. It stood on an acre of land overlooking the river; on the hill above the house was a large, spring-fed natural pool'

Flynn goes on to describe her maid and the fact that Friedan got thrown out of the local school carpool when the other mothers found out that this exponent of work outside the home was sending their children off to classes in a taxi rather than driving them there herself.  What becomes abundantly clear is that Friedan didn't take to domestic life. And that doesn't make her qualified to judge those women that have significantly fewer qualms with leading a more traditional woman's life, be it only while their children are small or for the rest of the other women's lives.

What Hilary Rosen, Representative Scott, his wife Susannah, and any number of Democrat talking heads on cable television don't realize -- and don't want to realize -- is that 1) failure to lead in some area of life doesn't qualify you to tell others how to succeed in that area; and 2) even in fields where one is competent, unsolicited advice on how to micromanage someone else's life is not welcome. But it seems the Democrats can't stop engaging in this domestic politics version of Tourette's Syndrome, first identified at American Thinker in its international politics version years ago by Miguel Guanipa in relation to Iran.

One wonders if any health insurance plan, be it ObamaCare or something else, covers treatment for Political Tourette's Syndrome. Perhaps a better question would be whether there is, in fact, a cure for it -- other than being voted out of office.

The Democratic Party's attacks on Ann Romney are still the gift that keeps on giving.

Breitbart's Big Government website reports that U.S. House member from Florida, Scott Randolph, has attacked Mrs. Romney on his Twitter page. Here is what he said:

"How many house servants did stay-at-home-mom Ann Romney had [sic] to raise her kids. Just b/c (because) u don't have job make u a stay-at-home mom."

Randolph continued on a tirade that has thus far lasted a full day. 

As we reported yesterday, the President is tanking in the polls and all of the areas which women cite as their main concerns are the areas in which Obama receives the worst marks.

Apparently Rep. Randolph hasn't been reading the accounts of the early years of the Romneys' marriage where they had no money for hired help. But I have to congratulate Scott Randolph for doing his part to maximize the chances of swing state Florida going into the Republican column in November.

Wikipedia reports that Randolph "is married to the former Susannah Lindberg, a former community organizer and public interest activist who previously served on the staff of former U.S. Congressman Alan Grayson (D-FL) of Florida's 8th congressional district, to include serving as the congressman's campaign manager during Grayson's unsuccessful 2010 reelection campaign." This is doubly amusing because before looking at his mini-biography online, I sarcastically asked myself whether Randolph was taking political advice from the blowhard former Florida Congressman Alan Grayson. No, he is just intimately involved with Grayson's campaign manager.

A major source of the current feminist-Democrat concept that being a stay at home mom is worthy of derision and something women should aspire to transcend dates largely from the widespread influence of Betty Friedan's iconic 1963 book "The Feminine Mystique." In that tome, Friedan described marriage as a "comfortable concentration camp." Let's examine Ms. Friedan's own "concentration camp" with the help of Daniel J. Flynn, author of Intellectual Morons (2004). On pages 218-219, in chapter 12 ("Comfortable Concentration Camp"), Flynn quotes and paraphrases her biographer Daniel Horowitz (Betty Friedan and the Making of the Feminine Mystique) and states:

Central to the appeal of The Feminine Mystique was the idea that Friedan wrote from experience...

According to Horowitz, "a maid cleaned the house, a nurse took care of the children when they were young, and on special occasions a man served as chauffeur and butler."

She experienced some of the same benefits when she married Carl Friedan, an advertising executive who earned a large income...In 1957, the Friedans moved into not-so-Spartan living quarters overlooking the Hudson River. The mansion they inhabited... 'had eleven rooms, three bathrooms, and many elegant details such as marble fireplaces (that's plural fireplaces), French doors and arched windows. It stood on an acre of land overlooking the river; on the hill above the house was a large, spring-fed natural pool'

Flynn goes on to describe her maid and the fact that Friedan got thrown out of the local school carpool when the other mothers found out that this exponent of work outside the home was sending their children off to classes in a taxi rather than driving them there herself.  What becomes abundantly clear is that Friedan didn't take to domestic life. And that doesn't make her qualified to judge those women that have significantly fewer qualms with leading a more traditional woman's life, be it only while their children are small or for the rest of the other women's lives.

What Hilary Rosen, Representative Scott, his wife Susannah, and any number of Democrat talking heads on cable television don't realize -- and don't want to realize -- is that 1) failure to lead in some area of life doesn't qualify you to tell others how to succeed in that area; and 2) even in fields where one is competent, unsolicited advice on how to micromanage someone else's life is not welcome. But it seems the Democrats can't stop engaging in this domestic politics version of Tourette's Syndrome, first identified at American Thinker in its international politics version years ago by Miguel Guanipa in relation to Iran.

One wonders if any health insurance plan, be it ObamaCare or something else, covers treatment for Political Tourette's Syndrome. Perhaps a better question would be whether there is, in fact, a cure for it -- other than being voted out of office.

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