Those who can't laugh are lost

Rosslyn Smith
Amid the American media fabricated nonsense about their imagined Republican War on Women here comes some amusing political silliness from North of the border.  Wildrose is a political party in the province of Alberta that is to the right of Canada's national Conservative Party.  Its leader, Danielle Smith, seems to have a healthy sense of humor about what a graphic artist did to her image on the party's campaign bus. 
 
Indeed one suspects those who have actually expressed righteous indignation about the bus probably wouldn't be caught dead voting for Danielle Smith. 

"These stories continue to reinforce stereotypes about women... they tend to focus on women's' bodies instead of focusing on what women bring to the table in terms of their competencies," said Clare Beckton, executive director of Carleton University's Centre for Women in Politics and Public Leadership in Ottawa.

"It can and does make women think twice about running (for office)."

 Beckton said it's "highly unlikely if this was a male candidate that they would be making these kinds of comments" and that "sexism continues to exist" for women who want to become involved in politics.

Ms Beckton, here's some advice.  Lighten up.  It's really funny.  As someone whose GPA was on the opposite side of the scale from her cup size, I was the target of more than my fair share of boob jokes in my younger days.  I always found well timed humor is far more effective than whiny feminist indignation. Thus I have to ask.  Does Danielle have a ready response for when her opponents go negative with the claim they can prove those are just retreads and she has been deceiving voters?

Amid the American media fabricated nonsense about their imagined Republican War on Women here comes some amusing political silliness from North of the border.  Wildrose is a political party in the province of Alberta that is to the right of Canada's national Conservative Party.  Its leader, Danielle Smith, seems to have a healthy sense of humor about what a graphic artist did to her image on the party's campaign bus. 
 
Indeed one suspects those who have actually expressed righteous indignation about the bus probably wouldn't be caught dead voting for Danielle Smith. 

"These stories continue to reinforce stereotypes about women... they tend to focus on women's' bodies instead of focusing on what women bring to the table in terms of their competencies," said Clare Beckton, executive director of Carleton University's Centre for Women in Politics and Public Leadership in Ottawa.

"It can and does make women think twice about running (for office)."

 Beckton said it's "highly unlikely if this was a male candidate that they would be making these kinds of comments" and that "sexism continues to exist" for women who want to become involved in politics.

Ms Beckton, here's some advice.  Lighten up.  It's really funny.  As someone whose GPA was on the opposite side of the scale from her cup size, I was the target of more than my fair share of boob jokes in my younger days.  I always found well timed humor is far more effective than whiny feminist indignation. Thus I have to ask.  Does Danielle have a ready response for when her opponents go negative with the claim they can prove those are just retreads and she has been deceiving voters?