Sexuality no longer a private matter in California

Thomas Lifson
The relentless advocates of identity politics don't care about antique notions like privacy in their campaign to make everything subject to quota.  Three weeks ago, Lee DeCovnick wrote about the State of California requiring all judges to make a declaration of their sexuality. He asked:

Now that the beastly camel has poked its nose into the tent, can we expect a question on sexual orientation as part of the admissions process for colleges and universities?  Just how soon until sexual orientation becomes a factor in receiving preferential treatment in hiring for state jobs, bidding on state contracts, and granting professional licensees from state boards? 

Lee has proven prescient. CBS Los Angeles reports:

 The next influx of UC students may be asked to state their sexual orientation.

In January, the Academic Senate recommended that upon accepting admission offers from a University of California school students should have the option of identifying themselves as lesbian, gay, bi-sexual or transgender.

The UC Board of Admissions and Relations with Schools had mixed reactions but agreed that the question would allow them to collect important statistical information. They recommended putting the question on the SIR forms instead of college applications to protect students' privacy.

While I celebrate Lee's predictive powers, I am afraid to ask him, "What's next?"

The relentless advocates of identity politics don't care about antique notions like privacy in their campaign to make everything subject to quota.  Three weeks ago, Lee DeCovnick wrote about the State of California requiring all judges to make a declaration of their sexuality. He asked:

Now that the beastly camel has poked its nose into the tent, can we expect a question on sexual orientation as part of the admissions process for colleges and universities?  Just how soon until sexual orientation becomes a factor in receiving preferential treatment in hiring for state jobs, bidding on state contracts, and granting professional licensees from state boards? 

Lee has proven prescient. CBS Los Angeles reports:

 The next influx of UC students may be asked to state their sexual orientation.

In January, the Academic Senate recommended that upon accepting admission offers from a University of California school students should have the option of identifying themselves as lesbian, gay, bi-sexual or transgender.

The UC Board of Admissions and Relations with Schools had mixed reactions but agreed that the question would allow them to collect important statistical information. They recommended putting the question on the SIR forms instead of college applications to protect students' privacy.

While I celebrate Lee's predictive powers, I am afraid to ask him, "What's next?"