Poor organization, unfair rule, will cost Santorum in Ohio

It can be aruged that the arcane, stupid, and even unfair rules governing the awarding of delegates in many states should be scrapped in favor of a more equitable system.

Ohio is a case in point. Because Rick Santorum failed to get the required number of signatures in several congressional districts, even if he wins Ohio he may lose the delegate battle with Mitt Romney.

ABC News:

In three of the state's 16 congressional districts, including two that are near Ohio's border with Pennsylvania, Santorum will lose any delegates he might have won because his campaign failed to meet the state's eligibility requirements months ago.

Those three districts alone take 9 delegates out of a total of 66 off the table for Santorum.

But it gets worse: Nine more Ohio delegates may also be in jeopardy.

Sources say that in six other congressional districts - the third, fourth, eighth, tenth, twelfth and sixteenth - Santorum submitted fewer names than required to be eligible for all three delegates up-for-grabs in each district.

That means even if he wins in those places, he might not be able to receive the full contingent of delegates.

In the three districts where Santorum did not submit a delegate slate at all, he will not be able to receive any delegates. In the six where he submitted only a partial slate, he is eligible to be awarded only the number of delegates he submitted, assuming he wins a particular district.

Chris Maloney, a spokesman for the Ohio Republican Party, said the leftover delegates will be considered "unbound" and the campaigns will be able to file a petition with the state party to claim them. Once such a petition is filed, Ohio GOP Chairman Kevin DeWine is required to impanel a "committee on contests" composed of three members of the Ohio GOP's central committee to sort out the delegate awards.

Like Michigan, where Santorum was frozen out of being awarded any superdelegates, despite finishing a strong second (because the state GOP is largely made up of establishment Republicans), there is a real possibility that in the end, Romney will be able to claim delegates in districts he didn't win, thus taking home more delegates than Santorum even if he loses the state.

Santorum is being unnecessarily penalized for emerging late as a viable candidate. As long as he does what is required to get on the statewide ballot, why the extra burden to gather signatures in each congressional district to be eligible for delegates? The rule is designed to stop an insurgent with little cash or organization from winning the day. It's a bad rule and should be changed for the 2016 race.

It can be aruged that the arcane, stupid, and even unfair rules governing the awarding of delegates in many states should be scrapped in favor of a more equitable system.

Ohio is a case in point. Because Rick Santorum failed to get the required number of signatures in several congressional districts, even if he wins Ohio he may lose the delegate battle with Mitt Romney.

ABC News:

In three of the state's 16 congressional districts, including two that are near Ohio's border with Pennsylvania, Santorum will lose any delegates he might have won because his campaign failed to meet the state's eligibility requirements months ago.

Those three districts alone take 9 delegates out of a total of 66 off the table for Santorum.

But it gets worse: Nine more Ohio delegates may also be in jeopardy.

Sources say that in six other congressional districts - the third, fourth, eighth, tenth, twelfth and sixteenth - Santorum submitted fewer names than required to be eligible for all three delegates up-for-grabs in each district.

That means even if he wins in those places, he might not be able to receive the full contingent of delegates.

In the three districts where Santorum did not submit a delegate slate at all, he will not be able to receive any delegates. In the six where he submitted only a partial slate, he is eligible to be awarded only the number of delegates he submitted, assuming he wins a particular district.

Chris Maloney, a spokesman for the Ohio Republican Party, said the leftover delegates will be considered "unbound" and the campaigns will be able to file a petition with the state party to claim them. Once such a petition is filed, Ohio GOP Chairman Kevin DeWine is required to impanel a "committee on contests" composed of three members of the Ohio GOP's central committee to sort out the delegate awards.

Like Michigan, where Santorum was frozen out of being awarded any superdelegates, despite finishing a strong second (because the state GOP is largely made up of establishment Republicans), there is a real possibility that in the end, Romney will be able to claim delegates in districts he didn't win, thus taking home more delegates than Santorum even if he loses the state.

Santorum is being unnecessarily penalized for emerging late as a viable candidate. As long as he does what is required to get on the statewide ballot, why the extra burden to gather signatures in each congressional district to be eligible for delegates? The rule is designed to stop an insurgent with little cash or organization from winning the day. It's a bad rule and should be changed for the 2016 race.

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