Poll shows deep pessimism about Obama's policies

Rick Moran
The Hill poll that came out yesterday revealed a deep pessimism by the public regarding President Obama's economic and energy policies.

The poll also shows that 49% of the public believes the Supreme Court ruling on Obamacare will be "unfavorable" to the law:

On economic issues, 62 percent of voters say Obama's policies will increase the debt, while 25 percent think they will cut it, and by a 48-percent-to-38-percent margin, voters believe those policies will increase joblessness rather than put people back to work.

On energy, 58 percent say Obama's policies will result in gasoline prices increasing, while just 20 percent expect them to cut prices -- and by a 46-percent-to-36-percent margin, voters believe they will cause the United States to become even more dependent on foreign oil. 

Voters' wide-ranging pessimism comes as gasoline prices have risen sharply, which often dampens attitudes among U.S. voters toward those in power, and as opinions remain sharply divided on the president's healthcare law.

The measure, on which the court will hear oral arguments later this month and is expected to rule in the summer, is not expected to fare well with the court's conservatives, though experts say it is unlikely the entire law will be undone.

The results also run contrary to indications that the economy is recovering more quickly and to other recent surveys showing the public is increasingly optimistic about its improvement.

Notably, a Fox News poll released Wednesday found that 58 percent of voters had seen signs of economic progress. And a Washington Post/ABC News poll that concluded March 10 found that 49 percent think the economy is beginning to recover, compared with 36 percent in November.

With numbers like these, why is Obama even competitive with any GOP candidate? It appears that Obama's 2008 coalition is reforming. Minorities approve of his policies far more than whites. His numbers are climbing among those 18-30 years old. Union members and college and post college grads are still giving him strong support.

We see this in his approval rating. In most polls, whites give Obama an approval rating in the low to mid 30's. But his old 2008 coalition gives him ratings in the mid to high 50's. It looks like there is a sizable - perhaps a majority - of voters who are willing to give Obama a second term at this point despite his dismal record on the economy.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky


The Hill poll that came out yesterday revealed a deep pessimism by the public regarding President Obama's economic and energy policies.

The poll also shows that 49% of the public believes the Supreme Court ruling on Obamacare will be "unfavorable" to the law:

On economic issues, 62 percent of voters say Obama's policies will increase the debt, while 25 percent think they will cut it, and by a 48-percent-to-38-percent margin, voters believe those policies will increase joblessness rather than put people back to work.

On energy, 58 percent say Obama's policies will result in gasoline prices increasing, while just 20 percent expect them to cut prices -- and by a 46-percent-to-36-percent margin, voters believe they will cause the United States to become even more dependent on foreign oil. 

Voters' wide-ranging pessimism comes as gasoline prices have risen sharply, which often dampens attitudes among U.S. voters toward those in power, and as opinions remain sharply divided on the president's healthcare law.

The measure, on which the court will hear oral arguments later this month and is expected to rule in the summer, is not expected to fare well with the court's conservatives, though experts say it is unlikely the entire law will be undone.

The results also run contrary to indications that the economy is recovering more quickly and to other recent surveys showing the public is increasingly optimistic about its improvement.

Notably, a Fox News poll released Wednesday found that 58 percent of voters had seen signs of economic progress. And a Washington Post/ABC News poll that concluded March 10 found that 49 percent think the economy is beginning to recover, compared with 36 percent in November.

With numbers like these, why is Obama even competitive with any GOP candidate? It appears that Obama's 2008 coalition is reforming. Minorities approve of his policies far more than whites. His numbers are climbing among those 18-30 years old. Union members and college and post college grads are still giving him strong support.

We see this in his approval rating. In most polls, whites give Obama an approval rating in the low to mid 30's. But his old 2008 coalition gives him ratings in the mid to high 50's. It looks like there is a sizable - perhaps a majority - of voters who are willing to give Obama a second term at this point despite his dismal record on the economy.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky