Obama to use FCC as partisan tool in war on Super-Pacs.

The Federal Communications Commission, headed by Barack Obama's law school friend and political appointee, Julius Genachowski, is weighing a sudden change in regulations that would cast a shining light on political spending by so-called super-PACs.

Todd Shield's reports in Business Week:

Technically, the amount of money campaigns spend to run attack ads on TV is public information. By law, all broadcasters have to keep records of political ad buys, including their cost, and show them to anyone who asks. That doesn't mean the data are easily accessible. You have to trek to TV stations during business hours, persuade a worker to fetch the records, and sometimes even produce exact change if you want to photocopy them.

"In a broadband world, that just doesn't make any sense," Julius Genachowski, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, said last fall. The agency is weighing a regulation that would force broadcasting companies to report political-ad sales data on a centralized website the FCC would manage. Putting records online-broadcasters would have to upload an ad buy the same day they close the sale-could make it easier to trace spending by super-PACs and other outside groups, especially those that aren't required to disclose their donors.

Barack Obama and his campaign team have recognized that so-called super-PACs pose a challenge to their reelection efforts. These groups have been blossoming ever since the Supreme Court supported the First Amendment in its Citizens United ruling. Their decision elicited a unprecedented and disgraceful attack on the Supreme Court by Barack Obama during his State of the Union address last year (the Supremes were in attendance; they do not have to be but consider it a sign of respect for our constitutional system). He and his minions claimed, falsely, that the ruling would allow foreigners to fund campaigns in America. Super-PACs are a way to give Americans information that the Obama-supporting media may decide not to report. Thus, the Obama campaign effort to shut them down.

There has been a constant drumbeat against super-PACs. The Koch brothers, Sheldon Adelson and other funders of  super-PACs have been reviled and pummeled by Obama allies in the media and in Washington because they are not Obama-supporters.

Now the FCC has become one more government department being used by Barack Obama as a partisan tool. The change in regulations that the FCC is contemplating would impose huge costs on private broadcasters. The Obama team does not care about profits and losses of private businesses. They - and their allies - will use this data to attack super-PACs and try to chill the exercise of free speech. There is not one trick they will not use to win in November.

The Constitution is merely a piece of fading parchment to Barack Obama.


The Federal Communications Commission, headed by Barack Obama's law school friend and political appointee, Julius Genachowski, is weighing a sudden change in regulations that would cast a shining light on political spending by so-called super-PACs.

Todd Shield's reports in Business Week:

Technically, the amount of money campaigns spend to run attack ads on TV is public information. By law, all broadcasters have to keep records of political ad buys, including their cost, and show them to anyone who asks. That doesn't mean the data are easily accessible. You have to trek to TV stations during business hours, persuade a worker to fetch the records, and sometimes even produce exact change if you want to photocopy them.

"In a broadband world, that just doesn't make any sense," Julius Genachowski, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, said last fall. The agency is weighing a regulation that would force broadcasting companies to report political-ad sales data on a centralized website the FCC would manage. Putting records online-broadcasters would have to upload an ad buy the same day they close the sale-could make it easier to trace spending by super-PACs and other outside groups, especially those that aren't required to disclose their donors.

Barack Obama and his campaign team have recognized that so-called super-PACs pose a challenge to their reelection efforts. These groups have been blossoming ever since the Supreme Court supported the First Amendment in its Citizens United ruling. Their decision elicited a unprecedented and disgraceful attack on the Supreme Court by Barack Obama during his State of the Union address last year (the Supremes were in attendance; they do not have to be but consider it a sign of respect for our constitutional system). He and his minions claimed, falsely, that the ruling would allow foreigners to fund campaigns in America. Super-PACs are a way to give Americans information that the Obama-supporting media may decide not to report. Thus, the Obama campaign effort to shut them down.

There has been a constant drumbeat against super-PACs. The Koch brothers, Sheldon Adelson and other funders of  super-PACs have been reviled and pummeled by Obama allies in the media and in Washington because they are not Obama-supporters.

Now the FCC has become one more government department being used by Barack Obama as a partisan tool. The change in regulations that the FCC is contemplating would impose huge costs on private broadcasters. The Obama team does not care about profits and losses of private businesses. They - and their allies - will use this data to attack super-PACs and try to chill the exercise of free speech. There is not one trick they will not use to win in November.

The Constitution is merely a piece of fading parchment to Barack Obama.


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