Obama Stoking Racial Warfare Flames?

Ann Kane
A week ago, Obama brought his children into his politics; except this time he talked about an imaginary son looking like the slain Trayvon Martin. Pulls at the heartstrings, doesn't it? But it also heightens racial tensions in an already volatile social atmosphere.

That was Friday. Then three days later in South Carolina Annette McCullough, an 18 year old student at Lewisville High School, brutally attacked an opponent during a soccer match. The opponent appears to have accidentally tripped the senior after the two were heading in the same direction for the ball.

In retaliation, McCullough grabbed hold of the other girl's ponytail [see video], then threw her to the ground and began to pummel the girl with her fist at least 10 times.

The sheriff has charged the attacker with "third degree assault," but the unnamed victim's parents have vowed to prosecute the case to the fullest extent of the law. It's been five days since this incident. Where are the rallies?

In my own town yesterday, I saw a young lady about 12 years old standing alone at a busy street corner holding a sign "Justice for Trayvon." Surely the girl believes that's the right thing to do. She has learned to speak her mind and protest in a free America. This is a good thing, but speaking out for justice has to be based on the truth. Otherwise, it contributes to chaos.

Back in 1968 after the riots in DC, my sister and her friend were walking home from the bus stop. Coming toward them were three girls who quite simply didn't like the color of my sister's skin, so they proceeded to beat her up. She came in the house with a swollen face and black eyes. Senseless, yet true.

Another of my sisters was beaten just because of the rage of the attacker; there was no provocation on my sister's part. And even though these things happened to my family members, I didn't give in to the idea that revenge against others who harm you is the way to react.

So, when the president stokes the flames of racial discontent, does he become complicit in the crimes committed in the aftermath?

Read more Ann Kane at Potter Williams Report

A week ago, Obama brought his children into his politics; except this time he talked about an imaginary son looking like the slain Trayvon Martin. Pulls at the heartstrings, doesn't it? But it also heightens racial tensions in an already volatile social atmosphere.

That was Friday. Then three days later in South Carolina Annette McCullough, an 18 year old student at Lewisville High School, brutally attacked an opponent during a soccer match. The opponent appears to have accidentally tripped the senior after the two were heading in the same direction for the ball.

In retaliation, McCullough grabbed hold of the other girl's ponytail [see video], then threw her to the ground and began to pummel the girl with her fist at least 10 times.

The sheriff has charged the attacker with "third degree assault," but the unnamed victim's parents have vowed to prosecute the case to the fullest extent of the law. It's been five days since this incident. Where are the rallies?

In my own town yesterday, I saw a young lady about 12 years old standing alone at a busy street corner holding a sign "Justice for Trayvon." Surely the girl believes that's the right thing to do. She has learned to speak her mind and protest in a free America. This is a good thing, but speaking out for justice has to be based on the truth. Otherwise, it contributes to chaos.

Back in 1968 after the riots in DC, my sister and her friend were walking home from the bus stop. Coming toward them were three girls who quite simply didn't like the color of my sister's skin, so they proceeded to beat her up. She came in the house with a swollen face and black eyes. Senseless, yet true.

Another of my sisters was beaten just because of the rage of the attacker; there was no provocation on my sister's part. And even though these things happened to my family members, I didn't give in to the idea that revenge against others who harm you is the way to react.

So, when the president stokes the flames of racial discontent, does he become complicit in the crimes committed in the aftermath?

Read more Ann Kane at Potter Williams Report