Gallup: Republicans more sympathetic to Israel than Democrats

A Republican Jewish Coalition news release on Friday included some revealing information:

Washington, D.C. (March 16, 2012) -- The Republican Jewish Coalition (RJC) today released an analysis of support for Israel broken down by political affiliation that reveals a clear "Israel Gap" between the parties. Republican support for Israel is 25 points higher than Democratic support, and according to Gallup, only a bare majority, 53% of Democrats, express sympathy with Israel.

"Democrats are suffering from an 'Israel Gap' and it's gotten worse under President Obama," said Matthew Brooks, RJC executive director.

Gallup, in a poll released recently, asked American voters, "Are your sympathies more with the Israelis or more with the Palestinians?" An overwhelming 78% of Republicans chose Israel, with 21% choosing the Palestinians or both/neither/no opinion. Among Democrats, a bare majority of 53% chose Israel, with 47% choosing otherwise. Among Independents, support for Israel was 56% with 44% choosing otherwise.

Over the last dozen years of Gallup polling on this question, there has been a clear trend: Republican support for Israel has risen steadily, moving from 60% to a high of 85%, while Democrat support has been relatively flat, at around 50%. Independent support has also moved upward over time, from 42% to a high of 60%.

Gallup's data over time shows a clear difference between Republicans and Democrats on Israel, with strong and increasing support for the Jewish state among Republicans, and lower and relatively unchanged support among Democrats.

This unmistakable trend should be a wake-up call to Jewish Democratic leaders and those who care about Israel, indicating that significant efforts should be made to rebuild strong support for Israel in the Democratic Party.

Source: Crosstab data and graphs supplied by Gallup. February 2012 poll analysis is here: 

The news release included the chart below from Gallup:


A whopping 78% of Republicans are sympathetic with Israel while only 53% of Democrats are sympathetic with Israel.  Unfortunately, the trend line for both Democrats and Republicans is moving in the wrong direction.  In 2010, Republicans who sympathized with Israel represented 85 percent of the party, and in 2011, 57% of Democrats sympathized with Israel.

Despite his public rhetoric to the contrary, it's obvious that President Obama regards Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu with distain and that he sees Israel as the problem in the Middle East.  Our president has bent over backwards and done everything that he can to curry favor with tinhorn despots throughout the region, but to no avail.  At every juncture, they have turned against him and us. 

Emboldened by the naiveté of a bowing President of the United States who prefers "leading from behind" to real leadership, Islamists are taking control in the Middle East, and led by Iran, they are stepping up pressure on Israel.  Sadly, I doubt that President Obama even knows that he's the cause of the problem, but thankfully, he's a politician to the core.  With his reelection threatened and his support among Jewish people waning, he has finally decided to act against Iran.  I only wish that it was for the right reason, not to enhance his chances of winning a second term in office.

Our president and his entire foreign policy apparatus should be shouting from the rooftop about the indiscriminate rocket attacks on Israel emanating from Gaza over the past few days.  As it is, he and they have shown remarkable restraint in even criticizing the culprits once again encouraging Israel's and our enemies.  The consequence is that Obama is helping to precipitate an all-out war in the Middle East, a war that the United States can ill afford for Israel to lose. 

Most Republicans understand the situation.  Some Democrats do as well, but many don't.  President Obama's handling of United States' interests in the Middle East is one of the many reasons why he should not be reelected.  Let's hope that Jewish voters recognize the problem and know where to place the blame for Israel's predicament.


Neil Snyder is a chaired professor emeritus at the University of Virginia.  His blog, SnyderTalk.com, is posted daily.



A Republican Jewish Coalition news release on Friday included some revealing information:

Washington, D.C. (March 16, 2012) -- The Republican Jewish Coalition (RJC) today released an analysis of support for Israel broken down by political affiliation that reveals a clear "Israel Gap" between the parties. Republican support for Israel is 25 points higher than Democratic support, and according to Gallup, only a bare majority, 53% of Democrats, express sympathy with Israel.

"Democrats are suffering from an 'Israel Gap' and it's gotten worse under President Obama," said Matthew Brooks, RJC executive director.

Gallup, in a poll released recently, asked American voters, "Are your sympathies more with the Israelis or more with the Palestinians?" An overwhelming 78% of Republicans chose Israel, with 21% choosing the Palestinians or both/neither/no opinion. Among Democrats, a bare majority of 53% chose Israel, with 47% choosing otherwise. Among Independents, support for Israel was 56% with 44% choosing otherwise.

Over the last dozen years of Gallup polling on this question, there has been a clear trend: Republican support for Israel has risen steadily, moving from 60% to a high of 85%, while Democrat support has been relatively flat, at around 50%. Independent support has also moved upward over time, from 42% to a high of 60%.

Gallup's data over time shows a clear difference between Republicans and Democrats on Israel, with strong and increasing support for the Jewish state among Republicans, and lower and relatively unchanged support among Democrats.

This unmistakable trend should be a wake-up call to Jewish Democratic leaders and those who care about Israel, indicating that significant efforts should be made to rebuild strong support for Israel in the Democratic Party.

Source: Crosstab data and graphs supplied by Gallup. February 2012 poll analysis is here: 

The news release included the chart below from Gallup:


A whopping 78% of Republicans are sympathetic with Israel while only 53% of Democrats are sympathetic with Israel.  Unfortunately, the trend line for both Democrats and Republicans is moving in the wrong direction.  In 2010, Republicans who sympathized with Israel represented 85 percent of the party, and in 2011, 57% of Democrats sympathized with Israel.

Despite his public rhetoric to the contrary, it's obvious that President Obama regards Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu with distain and that he sees Israel as the problem in the Middle East.  Our president has bent over backwards and done everything that he can to curry favor with tinhorn despots throughout the region, but to no avail.  At every juncture, they have turned against him and us. 

Emboldened by the naiveté of a bowing President of the United States who prefers "leading from behind" to real leadership, Islamists are taking control in the Middle East, and led by Iran, they are stepping up pressure on Israel.  Sadly, I doubt that President Obama even knows that he's the cause of the problem, but thankfully, he's a politician to the core.  With his reelection threatened and his support among Jewish people waning, he has finally decided to act against Iran.  I only wish that it was for the right reason, not to enhance his chances of winning a second term in office.

Our president and his entire foreign policy apparatus should be shouting from the rooftop about the indiscriminate rocket attacks on Israel emanating from Gaza over the past few days.  As it is, he and they have shown remarkable restraint in even criticizing the culprits once again encouraging Israel's and our enemies.  The consequence is that Obama is helping to precipitate an all-out war in the Middle East, a war that the United States can ill afford for Israel to lose. 

Most Republicans understand the situation.  Some Democrats do as well, but many don't.  President Obama's handling of United States' interests in the Middle East is one of the many reasons why he should not be reelected.  Let's hope that Jewish voters recognize the problem and know where to place the blame for Israel's predicament.


Neil Snyder is a chaired professor emeritus at the University of Virginia.  His blog, SnyderTalk.com, is posted daily.



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