Will The Central Valley Be Saved Today?

A.M. Mora y Leon
Well, it's a little extreme to put it that way. But H.R. 1837, sponsored by Visalia House Republican Devin Nunes, is probably the best news to come to the battered agricultural regions of the southwest Central Valley since the Hoover Dam was built.

The bill will basically end the long regime of environmentalist regulatory and judicial usurpations that have wrought great harm on some of America's most productive farmers. The bipartisan bill that even local environmentalists like, would restore the original model, the short story of which is to allow the northern Central Valley farmers to sell their excess water to the southern Central Valley farmers if they want. Up until now, various regulations and rulings have resulted in a Soviet-style central planning policy of flushing 70% of the Sacramento river valley's water into the sea, leaving a trail of blackened vineyards, dead almond tees and dust bowl wastelands in the southern part of the Valley, while unemployed farm workers must stand in line for alms, which, no kidding, have at times consisted of bags of carrots from China!

The bill will be voted on today in the house and is expected to pass. The Senate, with California's two Bay Area senators - Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer - opposed, may be harder - but at least this bill will force them to stand up and be counted - do you or don't you want these endless politicized water wars to keep drying up the Central Valley?

It's something they should answer, because the Central Valley is responsible for more than half of America's produce, and everyone has a stake in securing water for these farmers and ending the endless water wars.

Well, it's a little extreme to put it that way. But H.R. 1837, sponsored by Visalia House Republican Devin Nunes, is probably the best news to come to the battered agricultural regions of the southwest Central Valley since the Hoover Dam was built.

The bill will basically end the long regime of environmentalist regulatory and judicial usurpations that have wrought great harm on some of America's most productive farmers. The bipartisan bill that even local environmentalists like, would restore the original model, the short story of which is to allow the northern Central Valley farmers to sell their excess water to the southern Central Valley farmers if they want. Up until now, various regulations and rulings have resulted in a Soviet-style central planning policy of flushing 70% of the Sacramento river valley's water into the sea, leaving a trail of blackened vineyards, dead almond tees and dust bowl wastelands in the southern part of the Valley, while unemployed farm workers must stand in line for alms, which, no kidding, have at times consisted of bags of carrots from China!

The bill will be voted on today in the house and is expected to pass. The Senate, with California's two Bay Area senators - Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer - opposed, may be harder - but at least this bill will force them to stand up and be counted - do you or don't you want these endless politicized water wars to keep drying up the Central Valley?

It's something they should answer, because the Central Valley is responsible for more than half of America's produce, and everyone has a stake in securing water for these farmers and ending the endless water wars.