Terrorists preaching hate from behind bars

Rick Moran
Some of Great Britain's most notorious Islamic terrorists are still getting their message of hate out to the world even though they are in prison.

A security loophole has allowed these terrorists to advocate for violence while spreading hateful lies about the West.

Daily Mail:

Dozens of unrepentant extremists have been exposed as glorying in their fanaticism and encouraging others to consider further atrocities.

Among them are key figures in almost every major terrorist conspiracy of the past decade, including the July 2005 attacks in London. They include hate cleric Abu Hamza, lone-wolf attacker Roshonara Choudhry and failed BA bomber Rajib Karim.

The inmates have been able to voice their hate-filled opinions via a website apparently run by former members of a banned extremist organisation. Some boasted they were studying extremist material.

 News of the security breach sparked outrage and one MP called on the prison authorities to tighten up their systems. It comes at a sensitive time for the Government in the aftermath of the decision to release hate preacher Abu Qatada.

Steve McCabe, a Labour MP who sits on the Home Affairs Committee, said some of the material 'sounds dangerously close to incitement'.

He said: 'If the prison authorities claim they are monitoring and censoring material, then they are clearly not doing it effectively. It's time the regime was tightened up.'

At the centre of the scandal is a website, www.muslimprisoners.com, which offers to forward letters to more than 50 Muslim prisoners and display their replies. Transcripts of dozens of letters were posted as the website became a key information exchange and networking point for extremist sympathisers. The website offers advice on getting letters and presents to inmates.

One letter is written by Abdulla Ahmed Ali, the ringleader of a plot to blow up transatlantic airliners with liquid bombs. Ali, serving a 40-year sentence, hails the Taliban and says Muslims should 'sacrifice their lives and limbs' against the West.

I'd say that sounds a lot like incitement, Mr. McCabe.

The US regularly targets jihadist websites that cross the line and advocate violence. But more and more are popping up every day and the extremists seem to know exactly where they are and how to access them.

Eventually, technology will present a solution. Until then, the rantings of twisted minds will continue to clutter the internet.





Some of Great Britain's most notorious Islamic terrorists are still getting their message of hate out to the world even though they are in prison.

A security loophole has allowed these terrorists to advocate for violence while spreading hateful lies about the West.

Daily Mail:

Dozens of unrepentant extremists have been exposed as glorying in their fanaticism and encouraging others to consider further atrocities.

Among them are key figures in almost every major terrorist conspiracy of the past decade, including the July 2005 attacks in London. They include hate cleric Abu Hamza, lone-wolf attacker Roshonara Choudhry and failed BA bomber Rajib Karim.

The inmates have been able to voice their hate-filled opinions via a website apparently run by former members of a banned extremist organisation. Some boasted they were studying extremist material.

 News of the security breach sparked outrage and one MP called on the prison authorities to tighten up their systems. It comes at a sensitive time for the Government in the aftermath of the decision to release hate preacher Abu Qatada.

Steve McCabe, a Labour MP who sits on the Home Affairs Committee, said some of the material 'sounds dangerously close to incitement'.

He said: 'If the prison authorities claim they are monitoring and censoring material, then they are clearly not doing it effectively. It's time the regime was tightened up.'

At the centre of the scandal is a website, www.muslimprisoners.com, which offers to forward letters to more than 50 Muslim prisoners and display their replies. Transcripts of dozens of letters were posted as the website became a key information exchange and networking point for extremist sympathisers. The website offers advice on getting letters and presents to inmates.

One letter is written by Abdulla Ahmed Ali, the ringleader of a plot to blow up transatlantic airliners with liquid bombs. Ali, serving a 40-year sentence, hails the Taliban and says Muslims should 'sacrifice their lives and limbs' against the West.

I'd say that sounds a lot like incitement, Mr. McCabe.

The US regularly targets jihadist websites that cross the line and advocate violence. But more and more are popping up every day and the extremists seem to know exactly where they are and how to access them.

Eventually, technology will present a solution. Until then, the rantings of twisted minds will continue to clutter the internet.