Sarah Palin on raising her special needs son

Ethel C. Fenig
Vice presidential candidate, governor but most importantly mother, grandmother and wife, Sarah Palin writes   from the heart about her very real experience of raising her son afflicted with Down Syndrome.

Acknowledging

"Yes, these children are precious and loved. Yes, we face extra fears and challenges, but our children are a blessing, and the rest of the world is missing out in not knowing this."

She continues

Trig is almost 4 years old now, and every morning when he wakes up, he pulls himself up, rubs the sleep out of his eyes, looks around, and then starts applauding! He welcomes each day with thunderous applause and laughter. He looks around at creation and claps as if to say, "OK, world, what do you have for me today?"

My family knows that Trig will face struggles that few of us will ever have to endure, including people who can be so cruel to those not deemed "perfect" by society. The cruelty is more than made up for, though, when someone simply smiles at our son. Nothing makes me prouder. As I explained in a Thanksgiving article, I notice it happens often in airports. Travelers passing by will do a double-take when they see him, perhaps curious about the curious look on his face; or perhaps my son momentarily exercises an uncontrollable motion that takes the passerby by surprise. Perhaps, as an innocent and candid child announced when she first met Trig, they think, "He's awkward." But when that traveler pauses to look again and smiles, and maybe tells me what a handsome boy I have, I swell with pride. I am so thankful for their good hearts. They represent the best in our country, and their kindness shows the real hope we need today.

My family understands that up ahead, some days will be better than others. We will adapt and juggle things and work through it. But Trig applauds the day. And that's what he teaches us. That's our priority, and we're blessed by it.

 

Vice presidential candidate, governor but most importantly mother, grandmother and wife, Sarah Palin writes   from the heart about her very real experience of raising her son afflicted with Down Syndrome.

Acknowledging

"Yes, these children are precious and loved. Yes, we face extra fears and challenges, but our children are a blessing, and the rest of the world is missing out in not knowing this."

She continues

Trig is almost 4 years old now, and every morning when he wakes up, he pulls himself up, rubs the sleep out of his eyes, looks around, and then starts applauding! He welcomes each day with thunderous applause and laughter. He looks around at creation and claps as if to say, "OK, world, what do you have for me today?"

My family knows that Trig will face struggles that few of us will ever have to endure, including people who can be so cruel to those not deemed "perfect" by society. The cruelty is more than made up for, though, when someone simply smiles at our son. Nothing makes me prouder. As I explained in a Thanksgiving article, I notice it happens often in airports. Travelers passing by will do a double-take when they see him, perhaps curious about the curious look on his face; or perhaps my son momentarily exercises an uncontrollable motion that takes the passerby by surprise. Perhaps, as an innocent and candid child announced when she first met Trig, they think, "He's awkward." But when that traveler pauses to look again and smiles, and maybe tells me what a handsome boy I have, I swell with pride. I am so thankful for their good hearts. They represent the best in our country, and their kindness shows the real hope we need today.

My family understands that up ahead, some days will be better than others. We will adapt and juggle things and work through it. But Trig applauds the day. And that's what he teaches us. That's our priority, and we're blessed by it.