Occupy protestors in London evicted from church steps

Not that anyone would want to use the church for its intended purpose, mind you. Compared to praying to God, the Occupy movement is far more important in the universal scheme of things.

But the church leadership have only themselves to blame They sang the praises of the Occupy movement and then, when people got tired of stepping over the 30-40 activists blocking the steps at St. Paul Cathedral, they begged police to evict the protestors.

The Guardian:

The cathedral's decision, coupled with a previous high court decision obtained by the City of London, meant police successfully removed the entire Occupy London Stock Exchange camp from the square outside St Paul's.

Police said 20 people had been arrested by 4.30am in the "largely peaceful" operation.

Police and bailiffs moved in to begin clearing the Occupy London encampment in the early hours of Tuesday morning. Activists protesting against the financial and banking elite were told by bailiffs that they had five minutes to pack their tents and leave or they would be obstructing a court order.

Dozens of activists started clearing away tents and belongings, but others began building a barricaded enclosure using wooden pallets and debris.

Hundreds of police officers with riot helmets ready by their sides and dozens of bailiffs in yellow vests waited alongside rubbish lorries and watched the eviction.

One protester, Ed Greens from north London, said he had been with Occupy since last year. "We were expecting them on Monday night or soon after," he said. "Some people will resist things like this, but for me personally there is nothing wrong with self-defence."

At midnight five spotlights illuminated the square as the standoff continued. At 2am the lights were briefly switched off. When turned on again, four people, believed by protesters to be police officers, were standing on the balcony of the cathedral. Soon after, police revealed to press that they had the cathedral's permission to remove protesters from its steps.

"I was shocked to see policemen on the balcony," said Naomi Colvin, a spokeswoman for Occupy. "It seemed to be collusion. Tammy [another activist] just gave an interview saying how betrayed she felt when she learned the cathedral gave permission for us to be removed from its steps.

Note the childlike confusion regarding the church officials who "colluded" with the police. Of course they cooperated. They were the ones asking for the protestors to be removed in the first place.

There is no accounting for people who believe that the entire world should revolve around their pathetic movement, and that not doing as they demand represents "betrayal."

Adulthood will come as a rude awakening to most of them.

Not that anyone would want to use the church for its intended purpose, mind you. Compared to praying to God, the Occupy movement is far more important in the universal scheme of things.

But the church leadership have only themselves to blame They sang the praises of the Occupy movement and then, when people got tired of stepping over the 30-40 activists blocking the steps at St. Paul Cathedral, they begged police to evict the protestors.

The Guardian:

The cathedral's decision, coupled with a previous high court decision obtained by the City of London, meant police successfully removed the entire Occupy London Stock Exchange camp from the square outside St Paul's.

Police said 20 people had been arrested by 4.30am in the "largely peaceful" operation.

Police and bailiffs moved in to begin clearing the Occupy London encampment in the early hours of Tuesday morning. Activists protesting against the financial and banking elite were told by bailiffs that they had five minutes to pack their tents and leave or they would be obstructing a court order.

Dozens of activists started clearing away tents and belongings, but others began building a barricaded enclosure using wooden pallets and debris.

Hundreds of police officers with riot helmets ready by their sides and dozens of bailiffs in yellow vests waited alongside rubbish lorries and watched the eviction.

One protester, Ed Greens from north London, said he had been with Occupy since last year. "We were expecting them on Monday night or soon after," he said. "Some people will resist things like this, but for me personally there is nothing wrong with self-defence."

At midnight five spotlights illuminated the square as the standoff continued. At 2am the lights were briefly switched off. When turned on again, four people, believed by protesters to be police officers, were standing on the balcony of the cathedral. Soon after, police revealed to press that they had the cathedral's permission to remove protesters from its steps.

"I was shocked to see policemen on the balcony," said Naomi Colvin, a spokeswoman for Occupy. "It seemed to be collusion. Tammy [another activist] just gave an interview saying how betrayed she felt when she learned the cathedral gave permission for us to be removed from its steps.

Note the childlike confusion regarding the church officials who "colluded" with the police. Of course they cooperated. They were the ones asking for the protestors to be removed in the first place.

There is no accounting for people who believe that the entire world should revolve around their pathetic movement, and that not doing as they demand represents "betrayal."

Adulthood will come as a rude awakening to most of them.

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