Mittmentum: Romney retakes national lead from Santorum

Rick Moran
It's one poll and it very well could be an outlier.

But Santorum has made some statements in the last week that, while popular with social conservatives and many on the right, has others a little nervous about his beliefs.

The Hill:

Gallup's tracking poll shows GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney overtaking rival Rick Santorum nationally, after a tumultuous February which saw the presumptive frontrunner trail by double digits in many national polls.

Numbers released Sunday show Romney with the support of 31 percent of likely-GOP voters with Santorum at 29 percent.  Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich comes in third with 15 percent support.

Support for Romney has surged nationally; last week Santorum held a 10 point lead over the former Massachusetts governor, in Gallup's survey. Saturday's Gallup five-day average showed Santorum only up 1 point, with 31 percent support to Romney's 30 percent.

Santorum had surged to the top of polls nationally and in key states after he rode a trifecta of victories in the Minnesota, Missouri and Colorado primaries earlier this month. 

Romney also fell behind in polls for Tuesday's Michigan primary, but, aided by a fundraising advantage and superior organization, has battled back. 

Polls released Friday showed him edging ahead of Santorum in his home state, where he grew up and where his father served as governor.

A Mitchell Research-Rosetta Stone survey showed Romney up in Michigan with 36 percent support from likely voters, followed by Santorum at 33 percent, Rep. Ron Paul (Texas) at 12 percent and Gingrich at 9 percent.

A poll from conservative polling outlet Rasmussen also showed Romney with the lead, holding 40 percent support to Santorum's 34 percent support.

We are going to see a schism between social conservatives and the rest of the Republican party for the foreseeable future. Santorum will do well in states that have a large socon vote while Romney will win where the socon vote is not as prevalent. Neither side will give an inch and while it probably won't mean a brokered convention, it will mean terrible platform fights and perhaps a walkout or two.

The split risks defeat in November. And if that happens, both sides will blame the other, further contributing to the bad feelings. It is a fight for the soul of the party and in that context, there will be no winners - only losers.

It's one poll and it very well could be an outlier.

But Santorum has made some statements in the last week that, while popular with social conservatives and many on the right, has others a little nervous about his beliefs.

The Hill:

Gallup's tracking poll shows GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney overtaking rival Rick Santorum nationally, after a tumultuous February which saw the presumptive frontrunner trail by double digits in many national polls.

Numbers released Sunday show Romney with the support of 31 percent of likely-GOP voters with Santorum at 29 percent.  Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich comes in third with 15 percent support.

Support for Romney has surged nationally; last week Santorum held a 10 point lead over the former Massachusetts governor, in Gallup's survey. Saturday's Gallup five-day average showed Santorum only up 1 point, with 31 percent support to Romney's 30 percent.

Santorum had surged to the top of polls nationally and in key states after he rode a trifecta of victories in the Minnesota, Missouri and Colorado primaries earlier this month. 

Romney also fell behind in polls for Tuesday's Michigan primary, but, aided by a fundraising advantage and superior organization, has battled back. 

Polls released Friday showed him edging ahead of Santorum in his home state, where he grew up and where his father served as governor.

A Mitchell Research-Rosetta Stone survey showed Romney up in Michigan with 36 percent support from likely voters, followed by Santorum at 33 percent, Rep. Ron Paul (Texas) at 12 percent and Gingrich at 9 percent.

A poll from conservative polling outlet Rasmussen also showed Romney with the lead, holding 40 percent support to Santorum's 34 percent support.

We are going to see a schism between social conservatives and the rest of the Republican party for the foreseeable future. Santorum will do well in states that have a large socon vote while Romney will win where the socon vote is not as prevalent. Neither side will give an inch and while it probably won't mean a brokered convention, it will mean terrible platform fights and perhaps a walkout or two.

The split risks defeat in November. And if that happens, both sides will blame the other, further contributing to the bad feelings. It is a fight for the soul of the party and in that context, there will be no winners - only losers.