Worth $14 million, Elizabeth Warren thinks she's not a wealthy investor

I think she actually believes that she isn't a wealthy investor. This kind of radical disconnect from reality is typical of many rich liberals because they believe that the care so much about the rest of us, that they are actually one of us.

Bussiness Insider:

"I realize there are some wealthy individuals - I'm not one of them, but some wealthy individuals who have a lot of stock portfolios" she told him.

Hard to see how Warren wouldn't be, by most standards, wealthy, according to the Personal Financial Disclosure form she filed to run for Senate shows that she's worth as much as $14.5 million. She earned more than $429,000 from Harvard last year alone for a total of about $700,000, and lives in a house worth $5 million.

She also has a portfolio of investments in stocks and bonds worth as as much as $8 million, according to the form, which lists value ranges for each investment. The bulk of it is in funds managed by TIAA-CREF.

Warren would not, of course, be particularly wealthy by the tony standards of the Senate. But she's also unlikely to draw the sort of popular identification with her financial status that might attach to Marco Rubio, whose home is underwater.

And efforts to pass herself off as one of the 99% for whom she aims to speak appear likely to backfire.

Evidently, most of Warren's stock is in the form of mutual funds. Why this would make a difference since all congressmen and senators put their stock wealth in blind trusts is a mystery.

And the notion that $8 million in mutual funds does not make her a wealthy investor is ludicrous. She would be just as susceptible to special interest pleadings as any other senator.

So much for the 99 percent's favorite candidate being one of them.



I think she actually believes that she isn't a wealthy investor. This kind of radical disconnect from reality is typical of many rich liberals because they believe that the care so much about the rest of us, that they are actually one of us.

Bussiness Insider:

"I realize there are some wealthy individuals - I'm not one of them, but some wealthy individuals who have a lot of stock portfolios" she told him.

Hard to see how Warren wouldn't be, by most standards, wealthy, according to the Personal Financial Disclosure form she filed to run for Senate shows that she's worth as much as $14.5 million. She earned more than $429,000 from Harvard last year alone for a total of about $700,000, and lives in a house worth $5 million.

She also has a portfolio of investments in stocks and bonds worth as as much as $8 million, according to the form, which lists value ranges for each investment. The bulk of it is in funds managed by TIAA-CREF.

Warren would not, of course, be particularly wealthy by the tony standards of the Senate. But she's also unlikely to draw the sort of popular identification with her financial status that might attach to Marco Rubio, whose home is underwater.

And efforts to pass herself off as one of the 99% for whom she aims to speak appear likely to backfire.

Evidently, most of Warren's stock is in the form of mutual funds. Why this would make a difference since all congressmen and senators put their stock wealth in blind trusts is a mystery.

And the notion that $8 million in mutual funds does not make her a wealthy investor is ludicrous. She would be just as susceptible to special interest pleadings as any other senator.

So much for the 99 percent's favorite candidate being one of them.



RECENT VIDEOS