Martin Luther King the Man - and the Legend

An excellent look at King both as man and legend in the Wall Street Journal today, King's birthday.

First, a look at the legend represented by the King Memorial on the Mall:

Some gaze upon this figure in silence. Some smile and pull out cell phone cameras. Others chat about how closely the statue resembles King. And some are moved to tears.

"Just all that this man did so that we could do anything and be anything," said Brandolyn Brown, 26, of Cheraw, S.C., who visited the memorial Saturday with her aunt and cousin.

"I know it took a lot more than him to get to where we are, but he was a big part of the movement."

Brown's aunt, Gloria Drake, 60, of Cheraw, S.C., said she remembers King almost as though he was Moses leading his people to the promised land, even when there were so many reasons to doubt things would get better in an era of segregated buses, schools and lunch counters.

"It was really just hostile," she said. "... And then we had a man that comes to tell us things are going to be better."

"Don't be mad, don't be angry," she recalled King's message. "Just come together in peace."

It was King's message of non-violence - not to fight back against the outrages committed by Southern authorities - that made King a legend. His courage, and those of his followers, was otherworldly. His accomplishments were not the result of bombings and terrorism, but rather the searing images of people demanding their rights and dignity by marching, or sitting down peacefully until the authorities recognized their moral superiority and gave in.

Then, there was King the man, as portrayed by Samuel L. Jackson in the Broadway play, "The Mountaintop":

On Broadway, theatergoers are seeing a different version of King - one that is more man than legend.

The realism was refreshing for Donya Fairfax, who marveled after leaving a matinee of "The Mountaintop" that she had never really thought of King cursing, as actor Samuel L. Jackson does while portraying King in the play.

"He was human and not someone who was above fault," said the 48-year-old, visiting from Los Angeles. "He cursed. He did things that people do behind closed doors. He was regular."

For some, such a portrayal would seem to chip away at King's memory. But for Natalie Pertz, who at 20 has come to know King only through the gauzy view of history, it seemed a precious reminder that it is not beyond the reach of the ordinary and the flawed to effect change.

"It's important for people our age to see that he wasn't this saint-like figure," she said. "It's making you see that just because you're not perfect, it doesn't mean you can't do good."

For M.E. Ward, seeing an in-the-flesh incarnation of King brought her back more than 40 years, to when she watched his soaring speeches on the television. No matter how human he seemed on stage, she said, he still carried a godly gift.

"Still charismatic, still an orator, and an individual who was able to move people through his speech," she said, adding that King enlightened the world with a message "to be peaceful, to be patient, to be non-violent."

If George Washington is the "Father of our Country," and Thomas Jefferson the "Father of American Ideals," Martin Luther King can rightly be referred to as "The Father of the American Conscience."



An excellent look at King both as man and legend in the Wall Street Journal today, King's birthday.

First, a look at the legend represented by the King Memorial on the Mall:

Some gaze upon this figure in silence. Some smile and pull out cell phone cameras. Others chat about how closely the statue resembles King. And some are moved to tears.

"Just all that this man did so that we could do anything and be anything," said Brandolyn Brown, 26, of Cheraw, S.C., who visited the memorial Saturday with her aunt and cousin.

"I know it took a lot more than him to get to where we are, but he was a big part of the movement."

Brown's aunt, Gloria Drake, 60, of Cheraw, S.C., said she remembers King almost as though he was Moses leading his people to the promised land, even when there were so many reasons to doubt things would get better in an era of segregated buses, schools and lunch counters.

"It was really just hostile," she said. "... And then we had a man that comes to tell us things are going to be better."

"Don't be mad, don't be angry," she recalled King's message. "Just come together in peace."

It was King's message of non-violence - not to fight back against the outrages committed by Southern authorities - that made King a legend. His courage, and those of his followers, was otherworldly. His accomplishments were not the result of bombings and terrorism, but rather the searing images of people demanding their rights and dignity by marching, or sitting down peacefully until the authorities recognized their moral superiority and gave in.

Then, there was King the man, as portrayed by Samuel L. Jackson in the Broadway play, "The Mountaintop":

On Broadway, theatergoers are seeing a different version of King - one that is more man than legend.

The realism was refreshing for Donya Fairfax, who marveled after leaving a matinee of "The Mountaintop" that she had never really thought of King cursing, as actor Samuel L. Jackson does while portraying King in the play.

"He was human and not someone who was above fault," said the 48-year-old, visiting from Los Angeles. "He cursed. He did things that people do behind closed doors. He was regular."

For some, such a portrayal would seem to chip away at King's memory. But for Natalie Pertz, who at 20 has come to know King only through the gauzy view of history, it seemed a precious reminder that it is not beyond the reach of the ordinary and the flawed to effect change.

"It's important for people our age to see that he wasn't this saint-like figure," she said. "It's making you see that just because you're not perfect, it doesn't mean you can't do good."

For M.E. Ward, seeing an in-the-flesh incarnation of King brought her back more than 40 years, to when she watched his soaring speeches on the television. No matter how human he seemed on stage, she said, he still carried a godly gift.

"Still charismatic, still an orator, and an individual who was able to move people through his speech," she said, adding that King enlightened the world with a message "to be peaceful, to be patient, to be non-violent."

If George Washington is the "Father of our Country," and Thomas Jefferson the "Father of American Ideals," Martin Luther King can rightly be referred to as "The Father of the American Conscience."



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