Indiana Democrats Abandon Ship

Betsy M. Galliher
Like indignant toddlers stomping off to avoid a fair, yet unwinnable, fight, Indiana Democrats are staging another tempered walkout over pending Right to Work legislation; illustrating once again the Democrats' definition of compromise -- rewriting the Democratic process until it suits.   Or, maybe Indiana Democrats simply tripped and fell out of the Statehouse in the hullabaloo of abandoning their jobs. 

It's hard to trump Indiana Democrats' brazen five-week stint at an Illinois hotel, thwarting a vote on the same legislation in 2011.  Having exhausted the general assembly's patience with more delays, calls for referendum, amendments, debates, Democrats again find themselves desperate to avoid the inevitable -- the democratic process known as a vote.  Even the $1000 dollar anti-bolting fine now imposed on members each day they skip work is not enough to force Democrats back to the job they are paid to do.   And, a few thousand dollars in fines does seem a pittance, after all, considering millions in political coffers are at stake.

Today, the Indiana unions who fill Democrat coffers at the expense of workers' paychecks are threatening more compromise -- inconveniencing thousands of football fans, tourists, and vendors by blocking the streets to the Indianapolis Hoosier Dome on Super Bowl Sunday.   These tactics, among others, are one reason a majority of citizens in Indiana voiced their support of RTW in 2010 by overwhelmingly voting Republican control of the State's general assembly.

The majority of Hoosiers are well aware that convincing capable individuals they are incapable of representing their own best interest remains the siren song of Democrats and unions alike.  Democrats prove this by their very indignation over RTW legislation.  After all, the legislation in no way denies the right to organize.  So why the uproar, unless the very survival of unions is dependent on mandatory membership, coerced representation, and confiscated earnings, millions of which are doled out to Democrat candidates.  Maybe unions simply aren't the champions of workers they claim to be.

Right to Work legislation empowers the individual.  It attracts industry that is free to prosper without the damning confines of union control, promoting economic growth and the livelihoods of workers.  Is it any wonder those who thuggishly organize for collectivism, not to mention their own power, oppose it by any means necessary?

Indiana Democrats are sunk.   And RTW legislation isn't really their undoing -- the threat of individualism is.   No wonder they'd rather jump ship than admit the truth.

Like indignant toddlers stomping off to avoid a fair, yet unwinnable, fight, Indiana Democrats are staging another tempered walkout over pending Right to Work legislation; illustrating once again the Democrats' definition of compromise -- rewriting the Democratic process until it suits.   Or, maybe Indiana Democrats simply tripped and fell out of the Statehouse in the hullabaloo of abandoning their jobs. 

It's hard to trump Indiana Democrats' brazen five-week stint at an Illinois hotel, thwarting a vote on the same legislation in 2011.  Having exhausted the general assembly's patience with more delays, calls for referendum, amendments, debates, Democrats again find themselves desperate to avoid the inevitable -- the democratic process known as a vote.  Even the $1000 dollar anti-bolting fine now imposed on members each day they skip work is not enough to force Democrats back to the job they are paid to do.   And, a few thousand dollars in fines does seem a pittance, after all, considering millions in political coffers are at stake.

Today, the Indiana unions who fill Democrat coffers at the expense of workers' paychecks are threatening more compromise -- inconveniencing thousands of football fans, tourists, and vendors by blocking the streets to the Indianapolis Hoosier Dome on Super Bowl Sunday.   These tactics, among others, are one reason a majority of citizens in Indiana voiced their support of RTW in 2010 by overwhelmingly voting Republican control of the State's general assembly.

The majority of Hoosiers are well aware that convincing capable individuals they are incapable of representing their own best interest remains the siren song of Democrats and unions alike.  Democrats prove this by their very indignation over RTW legislation.  After all, the legislation in no way denies the right to organize.  So why the uproar, unless the very survival of unions is dependent on mandatory membership, coerced representation, and confiscated earnings, millions of which are doled out to Democrat candidates.  Maybe unions simply aren't the champions of workers they claim to be.

Right to Work legislation empowers the individual.  It attracts industry that is free to prosper without the damning confines of union control, promoting economic growth and the livelihoods of workers.  Is it any wonder those who thuggishly organize for collectivism, not to mention their own power, oppose it by any means necessary?

Indiana Democrats are sunk.   And RTW legislation isn't really their undoing -- the threat of individualism is.   No wonder they'd rather jump ship than admit the truth.