Assad accused by Arab League observer of war crimes

This after the Arab League agreed to continue the observer mission for another week.

But one observer tells it like it is.

Reuters:

The Arab League monitor, Anwar Malek, said he had resigned because the mission was powerless to prevent what he said were the "scenes of horror" he had seen in the restive city of Homs.

"The mission was a farce and the observers have been fooled," the Algerian told Al Jazeera English television. "The regime orchestrated it and fabricated most of what we saw to stop the Arab League from taking action against the regime ...

"The regime isn't committing one war crime but a series of crimes against its people," he added.

Malek's resignation was the latest blow to a mission already criticized for inefficiency and whose members have come under attack this week from both Assad supporters and protesters.

There was no immediate comment on Malek's remarks from the Arab League, which decided Sunday to keep monitors in place at least until they report again on their mission on January 19.

Under the Arab peace plan, Syrian authorities are supposed to stop attacking peaceful protests, withdraw troops and tanks from the streets, free detainees and open a political dialogue.

Meanwhile, Assad made his second appearance in less than week at a rally mostly made up of his Shabihah militia who are largely responsible for executing soldiers who don't shoot at civilians and terrorizing neighborhoods in cities like Homs and Hama.

Assad declared that he will be victorious over foreign "conspirators" who are trying to bring his regime down.


This after the Arab League agreed to continue the observer mission for another week.

But one observer tells it like it is.

Reuters:

The Arab League monitor, Anwar Malek, said he had resigned because the mission was powerless to prevent what he said were the "scenes of horror" he had seen in the restive city of Homs.

"The mission was a farce and the observers have been fooled," the Algerian told Al Jazeera English television. "The regime orchestrated it and fabricated most of what we saw to stop the Arab League from taking action against the regime ...

"The regime isn't committing one war crime but a series of crimes against its people," he added.

Malek's resignation was the latest blow to a mission already criticized for inefficiency and whose members have come under attack this week from both Assad supporters and protesters.

There was no immediate comment on Malek's remarks from the Arab League, which decided Sunday to keep monitors in place at least until they report again on their mission on January 19.

Under the Arab peace plan, Syrian authorities are supposed to stop attacking peaceful protests, withdraw troops and tanks from the streets, free detainees and open a political dialogue.

Meanwhile, Assad made his second appearance in less than week at a rally mostly made up of his Shabihah militia who are largely responsible for executing soldiers who don't shoot at civilians and terrorizing neighborhoods in cities like Homs and Hama.

Assad declared that he will be victorious over foreign "conspirators" who are trying to bring his regime down.


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