Wisconsin's GAB rules Adolf Hitler and Mickey Mouse can be counted on recall petitions

Phil Boehmke
In the wake of Friday's revelation that one particular Recall Scott Walker supporter had gleefully confessed that he signed some 80 separate petitions, we have learned of yet another bizarre assault on the democratic process in the Dairy State.  WISN reports that the state's Government Accountability Board (GAB) will accept the signatures of Adolf Hitler and Mickey Mouse if they meet certain standards. 
 
Suspicious signatures will be noted when the Government Accountability Board reviews the petitions, but reviewers will look to see that signatures are accompanied by a Wisconsin address and are dated as having been signed during the circulation period, board elections specialist David Buerger said.
 
"We will flag them, but we will not strike them without challenge," Buerger said after being asked whether Mickey Mouse's signature would be counted. He noted that in previous recall petitions, Adolf Hitler's name was struck because the address given was in Germany, not because of the name itself.
 
The same public sector unions and community activists who fought to prevent passage of Wisconsin's Voter I.D. bill (and are currently challenging the law) have once again proven by their contemptuous activities the dire need for due vigilance in the electoral process.  To even a casual observer the GAB's policy on suspicious signatures smells rather fishy, but perhaps they are just trying to be "fair."

It has become apparent that the petition campaign to recall Governor Walker will gather a sufficient number of signatures, one way or another.  Will Felix the Cat, Scooby Doo and their friends from cartoon land join forces with Joseph Stalin, Saul Alinsky and Barack Obama to force Scott Walker to face a recall election?  Any name will do just so long as the date is correct and there is a Wisconsin address.
 
December 15, 2011
 
In the wake of Friday's revelation that one particular Recall Scott Walker supporter had gleefully confessed that he signed some 80 separate petitions, we have learned of yet another bizarre assault on the democratic process in the Dairy State.  WISN reports that the state's Government Accountability Board (GAB) will accept the signatures of Adolf Hitler and Mickey Mouse if they meet certain standards. 
 
Suspicious signatures will be noted when the Government Accountability Board reviews the petitions, but reviewers will look to see that signatures are accompanied by a Wisconsin address and are dated as having been signed during the circulation period, board elections specialist David Buerger said.
 
"We will flag them, but we will not strike them without challenge," Buerger said after being asked whether Mickey Mouse's signature would be counted. He noted that in previous recall petitions, Adolf Hitler's name was struck because the address given was in Germany, not because of the name itself.
 
The same public sector unions and community activists who fought to prevent passage of Wisconsin's Voter I.D. bill (and are currently challenging the law) have once again proven by their contemptuous activities the dire need for due vigilance in the electoral process.  To even a casual observer the GAB's policy on suspicious signatures smells rather fishy, but perhaps they are just trying to be "fair."

It has become apparent that the petition campaign to recall Governor Walker will gather a sufficient number of signatures, one way or another.  Will Felix the Cat, Scooby Doo and their friends from cartoon land join forces with Joseph Stalin, Saul Alinsky and Barack Obama to force Scott Walker to face a recall election?  Any name will do just so long as the date is correct and there is a Wisconsin address.
 
December 15, 2011