Pakistan rejects US report on border attack

You knew they would, if only to flog the issue with their anti-American population a little longer.

VOA:

Pakistan's military has rejected the findings of a U.S. inquiry into last month's coalition attack that killed 24 Pakistan soldiers at Pakistan's border with Afghanistan.

The army said Friday the investigation's findings were "short on facts" and that it would give a detailed response once the formal report is received.

U.S. defense officials Thursday blamed inadequate coordination by both Pakistani and U.S.-led forces for last month's attack.

Brigadier General Stephen Clark, a U.S. Air Force officer who led the investigation, said "an overarching lack of trust" between the two countries prevented each side from receiving specific details on troops and combat locations.

Pentagon spokesman George Little said the investigation found that U.S. forces, given the information they had available to them at the time, acted "in self-defense and with appropriate force after being fired upon."

Pakistan would much prefer we grovel at their feet begging forgiveness and ignore the implications of the report that point to a dysfunctional relationship that led to misunderstandings on both sides. They still maintain that the attack was deliberate and calculated - something they find politically useful but won't be born out by an objective facts they come up with in their own version of events.


You knew they would, if only to flog the issue with their anti-American population a little longer.

VOA:

Pakistan's military has rejected the findings of a U.S. inquiry into last month's coalition attack that killed 24 Pakistan soldiers at Pakistan's border with Afghanistan.

The army said Friday the investigation's findings were "short on facts" and that it would give a detailed response once the formal report is received.

U.S. defense officials Thursday blamed inadequate coordination by both Pakistani and U.S.-led forces for last month's attack.

Brigadier General Stephen Clark, a U.S. Air Force officer who led the investigation, said "an overarching lack of trust" between the two countries prevented each side from receiving specific details on troops and combat locations.

Pentagon spokesman George Little said the investigation found that U.S. forces, given the information they had available to them at the time, acted "in self-defense and with appropriate force after being fired upon."

Pakistan would much prefer we grovel at their feet begging forgiveness and ignore the implications of the report that point to a dysfunctional relationship that led to misunderstandings on both sides. They still maintain that the attack was deliberate and calculated - something they find politically useful but won't be born out by an objective facts they come up with in their own version of events.


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