Medvedev says government will probe election rigging

Um...sure. They will find a unicorn before they find anything wrong with the recent election.

VOA:

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, facing unprecedented voter protests, says he has ordered his government to investigate allegations of electoral fraud in last week's parliamentary elections.

Medvedev broke two days of official silence Sunday, revealing the probe to followers on the social networking site Facebook.

He said he disagreed with tens of thousands of protesters who took to the streets of Moscow and other Russian cities Saturday to demand a rerun of December 4 elections won by the ruling party. But he said demonstrators had the right to voice their views.

Neither the president nor Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has appeared in public in recent days, as protest organizers sought to harness opposition to the outcome of the polls.

Critics accuse Putin's ruling United Russia party of complicity in widespread vote rigging and other irregularities.

Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev last week called for election results to be annulled and a new vote held.

The problem for Putin and Medvedev will not be in the investigation; there won't be much of one. The problem will be coming up with a convincing report that totally exonerates them. They may admit to a few, scattered instances of fraud just to make the report seem plausible. Anything beyond that is obviously not in the cards and a replay of the election is totally out of the question.


Um...sure. They will find a unicorn before they find anything wrong with the recent election.

VOA:

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, facing unprecedented voter protests, says he has ordered his government to investigate allegations of electoral fraud in last week's parliamentary elections.

Medvedev broke two days of official silence Sunday, revealing the probe to followers on the social networking site Facebook.

He said he disagreed with tens of thousands of protesters who took to the streets of Moscow and other Russian cities Saturday to demand a rerun of December 4 elections won by the ruling party. But he said demonstrators had the right to voice their views.

Neither the president nor Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has appeared in public in recent days, as protest organizers sought to harness opposition to the outcome of the polls.

Critics accuse Putin's ruling United Russia party of complicity in widespread vote rigging and other irregularities.

Former Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev last week called for election results to be annulled and a new vote held.

The problem for Putin and Medvedev will not be in the investigation; there won't be much of one. The problem will be coming up with a convincing report that totally exonerates them. They may admit to a few, scattered instances of fraud just to make the report seem plausible. Anything beyond that is obviously not in the cards and a replay of the election is totally out of the question.


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