Herman, how the heck does that work?

Jerry Shenk

We learned on Saturday, December 3, 2011 that presidential candidate Herman Cain had suspended his campaign. On Sunday evening, Politico reported that Cain would endorse Newt Gingrich on Monday.

If Cain only suspended his campaign, theoretically, at least, he can reactivate it. But should candidates whose campaigns are only in "suspension" endorse opponents? Is there a precedent for such an action?

If true, this scenario raises questions about the funds remaining in Cain's campaign war chest, funds he continued to solicit up until his Saturday announcement. At the very least, Cain should make an honest effort to return donations to the supporters who made them, many of whom contributed even though the early allegations which led to the suspension of Cain's campaign were weeks old.

As they say in political Washington, "The optics are bad."

We learned on Saturday, December 3, 2011 that presidential candidate Herman Cain had suspended his campaign. On Sunday evening, Politico reported that Cain would endorse Newt Gingrich on Monday.

If Cain only suspended his campaign, theoretically, at least, he can reactivate it. But should candidates whose campaigns are only in "suspension" endorse opponents? Is there a precedent for such an action?

If true, this scenario raises questions about the funds remaining in Cain's campaign war chest, funds he continued to solicit up until his Saturday announcement. At the very least, Cain should make an honest effort to return donations to the supporters who made them, many of whom contributed even though the early allegations which led to the suspension of Cain's campaign were weeks old.

As they say in political Washington, "The optics are bad."