Americans rejecting class warfare - Gallup

This pretty much makes the Occupy movement irrelevant in some respects:

Americans are now less likely to see U.S. society as divided into the "haves" and "have nots" than they were in 2008, returning to their views prior to that point. A clear majority, 58%, say they do not think of America in this way, after Americans were divided 49% to 49% in the summer of 2008.

[...]

The shift, documented by a Gallup poll conducted Nov. 28-Dec. 1, is noteworthy in that it came after 3 ½ years of economic turmoil in which more Americans have become unemployed and more have become negative about their personal finances. The current poll was also conducted as the Occupy Wall Street movement continues to focus on the disparities between the wealthiest 1% of Americans and everyone else.

If they had to choose, 58% of Americans would say they are in the "haves," rather than the "have nots" group. This breakdown has held remarkably steady over the past two decades of economic boom and bust, with a record-high 67% of Americans putting themselves in the "haves" category during the strong economic times of the late 1990s.

There are disparities in income in America but the people don't seem quite as concerned about that as liberals. The vast amount of material goods most Americans can afford allows people the luxury of realizing how good they have it compared to others.We are not generally an envious people so rather than dwell on how much someone else might possess in material wealth, we tend to focus and give thanks for what we have.

It's why so few show up at OWS demonstrations and why Obama's class warfare rhetoric is not resonating with anyone outside of his liberal base.



This pretty much makes the Occupy movement irrelevant in some respects:

Americans are now less likely to see U.S. society as divided into the "haves" and "have nots" than they were in 2008, returning to their views prior to that point. A clear majority, 58%, say they do not think of America in this way, after Americans were divided 49% to 49% in the summer of 2008.

[...]

The shift, documented by a Gallup poll conducted Nov. 28-Dec. 1, is noteworthy in that it came after 3 ½ years of economic turmoil in which more Americans have become unemployed and more have become negative about their personal finances. The current poll was also conducted as the Occupy Wall Street movement continues to focus on the disparities between the wealthiest 1% of Americans and everyone else.

If they had to choose, 58% of Americans would say they are in the "haves," rather than the "have nots" group. This breakdown has held remarkably steady over the past two decades of economic boom and bust, with a record-high 67% of Americans putting themselves in the "haves" category during the strong economic times of the late 1990s.

There are disparities in income in America but the people don't seem quite as concerned about that as liberals. The vast amount of material goods most Americans can afford allows people the luxury of realizing how good they have it compared to others.We are not generally an envious people so rather than dwell on how much someone else might possess in material wealth, we tend to focus and give thanks for what we have.

It's why so few show up at OWS demonstrations and why Obama's class warfare rhetoric is not resonating with anyone outside of his liberal base.



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