Syrian human rights violations in black and white

Rick Moran
A new UN report details thousands of human rights violations by the Syrian army and government.

CNN:

The U.N. independent international commission on Syria's assessment was based on interviews with 223 victims and witnesses, but observers were not allowed access to the country, the report said.

According to the report, evidence "documents patterns of summary execution, arbitrary arrest, enforced disappearance, torture, including sexual violence, as well as violations of children's rights."

Military deserters told the commission that they had been ordered to shoot at unarmed protesters without warning, the report said.

"The commission reiterates its call for immediate and unhindered access to the Syrian Arab Republic," the report said.

Earlier this month, the United Nations High Commission for Human Rights estimated that government forces had killed at least 3,500 civilians.

The report notes that up to 256 children have been tortured and killed by Syrian forces.

Meanwhile, Turkey is edging toward some kind of move that might involve its military. Under serious consideration is a "buffer zone" on its border in case of a mass exodus from Syria, as well as other military options including the establishment of a humanitarian corridor where food, medicine, and protection from Assad's forces could be given to civilians. The last two options won't happen without regional and international support. But if things continue the way they are, that may be forthcoming.


A new UN report details thousands of human rights violations by the Syrian army and government.

CNN:

The U.N. independent international commission on Syria's assessment was based on interviews with 223 victims and witnesses, but observers were not allowed access to the country, the report said.

According to the report, evidence "documents patterns of summary execution, arbitrary arrest, enforced disappearance, torture, including sexual violence, as well as violations of children's rights."

Military deserters told the commission that they had been ordered to shoot at unarmed protesters without warning, the report said.

"The commission reiterates its call for immediate and unhindered access to the Syrian Arab Republic," the report said.

Earlier this month, the United Nations High Commission for Human Rights estimated that government forces had killed at least 3,500 civilians.

The report notes that up to 256 children have been tortured and killed by Syrian forces.

Meanwhile, Turkey is edging toward some kind of move that might involve its military. Under serious consideration is a "buffer zone" on its border in case of a mass exodus from Syria, as well as other military options including the establishment of a humanitarian corridor where food, medicine, and protection from Assad's forces could be given to civilians. The last two options won't happen without regional and international support. But if things continue the way they are, that may be forthcoming.