Russian warships to patrol Syrian waters, deterring intervention

Rick Moran
Just a reminder whose side Vladmir Putin is on in the Syrian civil war. Haaretz:

Russian warships are due to arrive at Syrian territorial waters, a Syrian news agency said on Thursday, indicating that the move represented a clear message to the West that Moscow would resist any foreign intervention in the country's civil unrest.

Also on Friday, a Syrian official said Damascus has agreed "in principle" to allow an Arab League observer mission into the country.

But the official said Friday that Syria was still studying the details. The official asked not to be named because the issue is so sensitive.

The Arab League suspended Syria earlier this week over its deadly crackdown on an eight-month-old uprising. The 22-member body has proposed sending hundreds of observers to the country to try to help end the bloodshed.

Assad has been playing this game for months. He'll agree to a proposal and then fail to follow through. It is extremely doubtful that "hundreds" of Arab League observers will be allowed into the country. If more than a handful of carefully selected observers, each with their very own minder, is allowed in, the world will be surprised.

In the Libyan conflict, Russia was opposed but sat on the sidelines. This time, they mean to make a stand against any intervention ideas from the UN or the west.




Just a reminder whose side Vladmir Putin is on in the Syrian civil war. Haaretz:

Russian warships are due to arrive at Syrian territorial waters, a Syrian news agency said on Thursday, indicating that the move represented a clear message to the West that Moscow would resist any foreign intervention in the country's civil unrest.

Also on Friday, a Syrian official said Damascus has agreed "in principle" to allow an Arab League observer mission into the country.

But the official said Friday that Syria was still studying the details. The official asked not to be named because the issue is so sensitive.

The Arab League suspended Syria earlier this week over its deadly crackdown on an eight-month-old uprising. The 22-member body has proposed sending hundreds of observers to the country to try to help end the bloodshed.

Assad has been playing this game for months. He'll agree to a proposal and then fail to follow through. It is extremely doubtful that "hundreds" of Arab League observers will be allowed into the country. If more than a handful of carefully selected observers, each with their very own minder, is allowed in, the world will be surprised.

In the Libyan conflict, Russia was opposed but sat on the sidelines. This time, they mean to make a stand against any intervention ideas from the UN or the west.