OWS protestors stay at $700 a night hotel

The old leadership of the Soviet Union justified their enormous wealth, dachas on the Black Sea, and limos by saying that they needed more because they worked harder and had more responsibility than anyone else.

I'm sure that's something like the excuse these Occupy Wall Street protestors will give. New York Post:

A key Occupy Wall Street leader and another protester who leads a double life as a businessman ditched fetid tents and church basements for rooms at a luxurious hotel that promises guests can "unleash [their] inner Gordon Gekko," The Post has learned.

The $700-per-night W Hotel Downtown last week hosted both Peter Dutro, one of a select few OWS members on the powerful finance committee, and Brad Spitzer, a California-based analyst who not only secretly took part in protests during a week-long business trip but offered shelter to protesters in his swanky platinum-card room.

"Tents are not for me," he confessed, when confronted in the sleek black lobby of the Washington Street hotel where sources described him as a "repeat" guest.

Spitzer, 24, an associate at financial-services giant Deloitte, which netted $29 billion in revenue last year, admitted he joined the protest at Zuccotti Park several times.

[...]

During his stay, hotel sources said, he and other ragtag revolutionaries he brought into the hotel lived like 1 percenters. He would order up a roll-out bed to accommodate guests, they said.

"He's here all the time," a hotel source said. "We all see him at the protest."

Spitzer denied sheltering Occupiers. He claimed he only invited in a blogger buddy living at the park to wash off his camp grime.

Meanwhile, Peter Dutro, a member of the OWS finance committee, says he shelled out $500 of his own money to stay at the same hotel.

He said he spent $500 of his own money to get the room because he wanted a good night's rest ahead of the cause's two-month ceremony the next day and raucous post-raid protests.

"I knew . . . there was a high probability of getting arrested," he said. "I wanted a nice room. That's OK. Not everybody there is dirt poor."

He paid for the palace with his American Express card.

No. And even fewer can afford the kind of luxury that his fellow protestors are demonstrating against.







The old leadership of the Soviet Union justified their enormous wealth, dachas on the Black Sea, and limos by saying that they needed more because they worked harder and had more responsibility than anyone else.

I'm sure that's something like the excuse these Occupy Wall Street protestors will give. New York Post:

A key Occupy Wall Street leader and another protester who leads a double life as a businessman ditched fetid tents and church basements for rooms at a luxurious hotel that promises guests can "unleash [their] inner Gordon Gekko," The Post has learned.

The $700-per-night W Hotel Downtown last week hosted both Peter Dutro, one of a select few OWS members on the powerful finance committee, and Brad Spitzer, a California-based analyst who not only secretly took part in protests during a week-long business trip but offered shelter to protesters in his swanky platinum-card room.

"Tents are not for me," he confessed, when confronted in the sleek black lobby of the Washington Street hotel where sources described him as a "repeat" guest.

Spitzer, 24, an associate at financial-services giant Deloitte, which netted $29 billion in revenue last year, admitted he joined the protest at Zuccotti Park several times.

[...]

During his stay, hotel sources said, he and other ragtag revolutionaries he brought into the hotel lived like 1 percenters. He would order up a roll-out bed to accommodate guests, they said.

"He's here all the time," a hotel source said. "We all see him at the protest."

Spitzer denied sheltering Occupiers. He claimed he only invited in a blogger buddy living at the park to wash off his camp grime.

Meanwhile, Peter Dutro, a member of the OWS finance committee, says he shelled out $500 of his own money to stay at the same hotel.

He said he spent $500 of his own money to get the room because he wanted a good night's rest ahead of the cause's two-month ceremony the next day and raucous post-raid protests.

"I knew . . . there was a high probability of getting arrested," he said. "I wanted a nice room. That's OK. Not everybody there is dirt poor."

He paid for the palace with his American Express card.

No. And even fewer can afford the kind of luxury that his fellow protestors are demonstrating against.







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