Islamists winning in Morocco after first round of voting

But don't worry. The press is calling the Justice and Development party's coming victory in Morocco a triumph of "moderate" Islamists.

The Telegraph:

Morocco's moderate Islamists are the latest religious party to achieve spectacular gains on the back of the Arab Spring.

A month after Islamists won Tunisia's post-revolution election and days before their predicted surge in Egyptian polls, their Moroccan counterparts claimed to have achieved a similar breakthrough without bloodshed.

With official results expected Sunday, the Justice and Development Party (PJD) - a moderate Islamist movement which accepts the monarchy - said its own figures gave it a clear edge.

Projections show that the Islamists will win more than 100 seats. This will make them the biggest party but not large enough to rule without other parties in their coalition.

And just how "moderate" are these Islamists?

The party focused at first on social issues, such as opposition to summer music festivals and the sale of alcohol, but has shifted to issues with broader voter appeal like the fight against corruption and high unemployment.

During the current campaign it promised to cut poverty in half and raise the minimum wage by 50 per cent.

Unlike the banned Islamist opposition group Justice and Charity, the Justice and Development Party pledges its allegiance to the monarchy.

So, because the Islamists don't want to behead the king, they are considered "moderate?" It boggles the mind that liberties we take for granted in the west - and even in old Moroccon society - will disappear under these crazies and western news outlets applaud their moderation.



But don't worry. The press is calling the Justice and Development party's coming victory in Morocco a triumph of "moderate" Islamists.

The Telegraph:

Morocco's moderate Islamists are the latest religious party to achieve spectacular gains on the back of the Arab Spring.

A month after Islamists won Tunisia's post-revolution election and days before their predicted surge in Egyptian polls, their Moroccan counterparts claimed to have achieved a similar breakthrough without bloodshed.

With official results expected Sunday, the Justice and Development Party (PJD) - a moderate Islamist movement which accepts the monarchy - said its own figures gave it a clear edge.

Projections show that the Islamists will win more than 100 seats. This will make them the biggest party but not large enough to rule without other parties in their coalition.

And just how "moderate" are these Islamists?

The party focused at first on social issues, such as opposition to summer music festivals and the sale of alcohol, but has shifted to issues with broader voter appeal like the fight against corruption and high unemployment.

During the current campaign it promised to cut poverty in half and raise the minimum wage by 50 per cent.

Unlike the banned Islamist opposition group Justice and Charity, the Justice and Development Party pledges its allegiance to the monarchy.

So, because the Islamists don't want to behead the king, they are considered "moderate?" It boggles the mind that liberties we take for granted in the west - and even in old Moroccon society - will disappear under these crazies and western news outlets applaud their moderation.



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