A 911 hero and his flag

Harvey M. Sheldon

Just over ten years ago, a policeman risked his life to save hundreds of people endangered by an Islamic extremist attack on his country. He ran into the lobby of a World Trade Center building that had been devastated by an airliner collision, and sought to rescue victims of 9/11.  He survived, after helping others.

Within a few years he retired to a home in Florida.  His prized possession is a flag that flew at the World Trade Center.  Now, debilitated by cancer, which he attributes to the caustic dust, he has received a demand from his homeowners' association asking that he take down the flag.

There are certainly jerks and worse than jerks everywhere in America, but the Association of homeowners of the Fairways at Heron Bay complex in Coral Springs Florida have the inside track to ignominy.  Shame upon their heads, and disgrace on their reputations.

Just over ten years ago, a policeman risked his life to save hundreds of people endangered by an Islamic extremist attack on his country. He ran into the lobby of a World Trade Center building that had been devastated by an airliner collision, and sought to rescue victims of 9/11.  He survived, after helping others.

Within a few years he retired to a home in Florida.  His prized possession is a flag that flew at the World Trade Center.  Now, debilitated by cancer, which he attributes to the caustic dust, he has received a demand from his homeowners' association asking that he take down the flag.

There are certainly jerks and worse than jerks everywhere in America, but the Association of homeowners of the Fairways at Heron Bay complex in Coral Springs Florida have the inside track to ignominy.  Shame upon their heads, and disgrace on their reputations.