Unemployment rate for September unchanged at 9.1%

We're still not creating enough jobs to even keep pace with the number of new entrants into the jobs market.

New York Times:

The unemployment rate for September was unchanged from August, 9.1 percent.

With President Obama continuing to press a balky Congress to pass his jobs bill, the Labor Department's monthly snapshot highlighted the challenges for an administration faced with an economy that has struggled to deliver significant employment growth since the recovery started more than two years ago.

September's number of new jobs was well more than analysts had expected - one consensus predicted a gain of 55,000 jobs - and the Labor Department also revised the August figure of zero job growth to a gain of 57,000 jobs.

Still, the report came on the heels of disappointing data about consumer confidence and the housing market. Economists have also grown increasingly concerned about a ballooning European debt crisis that could send ripples across the Atlantic.

The economy created just 103,000 jobs - a sure sign that we are nowhere near seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. And there is still no guarantee that the anemic growth in the economy won't lead to another recession.

In short, very little good news in these new jobs numbers.




We're still not creating enough jobs to even keep pace with the number of new entrants into the jobs market.

New York Times:

The unemployment rate for September was unchanged from August, 9.1 percent.

With President Obama continuing to press a balky Congress to pass his jobs bill, the Labor Department's monthly snapshot highlighted the challenges for an administration faced with an economy that has struggled to deliver significant employment growth since the recovery started more than two years ago.

September's number of new jobs was well more than analysts had expected - one consensus predicted a gain of 55,000 jobs - and the Labor Department also revised the August figure of zero job growth to a gain of 57,000 jobs.

Still, the report came on the heels of disappointing data about consumer confidence and the housing market. Economists have also grown increasingly concerned about a ballooning European debt crisis that could send ripples across the Atlantic.

The economy created just 103,000 jobs - a sure sign that we are nowhere near seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. And there is still no guarantee that the anemic growth in the economy won't lead to another recession.

In short, very little good news in these new jobs numbers.




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