OWS 'organization' features 79 working groups

Rick Moran
Time Magazine's Nate Rawlings seems positively giddy that the small number of OWS protestors in Zucotti park have labored to bring forth a sort of "government" that features 79 - count 'em, 79 - "working groups:

In the six weeks since the group first gathered in lower Manhattan, it has become increasingly better organized. Its "working groups" have multiplied from a handful to 79, including those tasked with organizing the movement's public demands and handling the movement's media, alternative banking and sustainability needs, among many others.

But the Comfort Working Group is likely to play a particularly important role as Occupy prepares for winter. Since Week 1, the Comfort Working Group has been accepting donations of hats, gloves and blankets. It has been endeavoring to keep those who sleep in the park warm at night. On Saturday, many protesters remained in their tents, out of the harsh weather, but true to their promise, they didn't leave.

Occupy has remained stalwart throughout the last month and a half, vowing to endure indefinitely. On Oct. 10, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that he didn't know when the protests might end, but added, "I think part of it has probably to do with the weather." The protesters seem determined to prove Hizzhonor wrong.

Only a liberal in love with government could believe that 79 different entities making decisions in isolation from each other could be defined as being "better organized." As anyone who has held an office job could tell Mr. Rawlings and the OWS protestors, 79 working groups is a recipe for chaos, not "organization."

Imagine these jamokes in charge of even a village government. The townspeople would be screaming for relief in a matter of weeks.


Time Magazine's Nate Rawlings seems positively giddy that the small number of OWS protestors in Zucotti park have labored to bring forth a sort of "government" that features 79 - count 'em, 79 - "working groups:

In the six weeks since the group first gathered in lower Manhattan, it has become increasingly better organized. Its "working groups" have multiplied from a handful to 79, including those tasked with organizing the movement's public demands and handling the movement's media, alternative banking and sustainability needs, among many others.

But the Comfort Working Group is likely to play a particularly important role as Occupy prepares for winter. Since Week 1, the Comfort Working Group has been accepting donations of hats, gloves and blankets. It has been endeavoring to keep those who sleep in the park warm at night. On Saturday, many protesters remained in their tents, out of the harsh weather, but true to their promise, they didn't leave.

Occupy has remained stalwart throughout the last month and a half, vowing to endure indefinitely. On Oct. 10, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that he didn't know when the protests might end, but added, "I think part of it has probably to do with the weather." The protesters seem determined to prove Hizzhonor wrong.

Only a liberal in love with government could believe that 79 different entities making decisions in isolation from each other could be defined as being "better organized." As anyone who has held an office job could tell Mr. Rawlings and the OWS protestors, 79 working groups is a recipe for chaos, not "organization."

Imagine these jamokes in charge of even a village government. The townspeople would be screaming for relief in a matter of weeks.