Occupy Oakland calls for 'general strike'

Rick Moran
The labor unions are for it. So is the city government. The question is, will "tens of thousands" of Oaklandites refuse to go to work, as organizers are promising?

United Press:

Flyers announcing the strike said "all banks and corporations must close down for the day or we will march on them." The flyers called for solidarity with the global Occupy movement, an end to police aggression and pledged support for local schools and libraries.

Organizer Tim Simons said organized labor plans to participate.

Simons said the general strike would be "the largest organization project any of us have ever been involved in," and tens of thousands of people were expected to participate, the Oakland Tribune reported Monday.

Because of the diversity of perspectives, "there won't be one center of gravity driving the whole thing," Simons said.

The strike has received support from local labor leaders and union members. Unions had yet voted to officially support the strike but organizers said they expect a high level of participation, the Tribune reported.

Sue Piper, a spokeswoman for Mayor Nancy Quan, said city employees who want to support the strike can ask their supervisors for permission to use leave time, a floating unpaid furlough day, or a day off without pay on Wednesday.

They may indeed get "tens of thousands" of supporters to go on strike in this heavily unionized and far left liberal city. But I doubt that it will affect commerce very much, or transportation, or even impact city services.

And if the impact is minimal, what does that say about the OWS movement when it can't muster much of a protest on the friendliest of grounds?



The labor unions are for it. So is the city government. The question is, will "tens of thousands" of Oaklandites refuse to go to work, as organizers are promising?

United Press:

Flyers announcing the strike said "all banks and corporations must close down for the day or we will march on them." The flyers called for solidarity with the global Occupy movement, an end to police aggression and pledged support for local schools and libraries.

Organizer Tim Simons said organized labor plans to participate.

Simons said the general strike would be "the largest organization project any of us have ever been involved in," and tens of thousands of people were expected to participate, the Oakland Tribune reported Monday.

Because of the diversity of perspectives, "there won't be one center of gravity driving the whole thing," Simons said.

The strike has received support from local labor leaders and union members. Unions had yet voted to officially support the strike but organizers said they expect a high level of participation, the Tribune reported.

Sue Piper, a spokeswoman for Mayor Nancy Quan, said city employees who want to support the strike can ask their supervisors for permission to use leave time, a floating unpaid furlough day, or a day off without pay on Wednesday.

They may indeed get "tens of thousands" of supporters to go on strike in this heavily unionized and far left liberal city. But I doubt that it will affect commerce very much, or transportation, or even impact city services.

And if the impact is minimal, what does that say about the OWS movement when it can't muster much of a protest on the friendliest of grounds?