NY Times, Wash. Post censor Abbas's 'Holy Warriors' salute to his freed terrorists

Leo Rennert
As Israel gained the freedom of abducted Sgt. Gilad Shalit and, in exchange, released hundreds of Palestinian prisoners, many of them with blood on their hands, Mahmoud Abbas, the president of the Palestinian Authority, addressed  many of his freed terrorists at a joyous celebration in Ramallah.

 "You are freedom fighters and holy warriors for the sake of God and the homeland," Abbas exulted ("Abbas greets released Palestinian prisoners" Haaretz, Oct. 18)

Abbas 's embrace of terrorist killers as "freedom fighters" and "holy warriors" is clear evidence of his support of terrorism as a path to advance Palestinian national objectives.  Also, his "holy warrior" salute wasn't just an isolated burst of enthusiasm at the return of the prisoners.  Under Abbas's leadership, PA TV, PA textbooks and even sermons by PA-appointed clerics have been part of a concerted campaign to glorify Palestinian terrorists and suicide bombers.  Abbas has named many public facilities and spaces after some of the most blood-soaked bombers and killers of Israeli civilians.

Yet, neither the New York Times nor the Washington Post, in their Oct. 19 editions, saw fit to report Abbas's bellicose address in Ramallah in their coverage of the release of Palestinian prisoners in exchange for Shalit. 

The Times not only omitted coverage of Abbas's speech at the Ramallah rally; it depicted Abbas as a leader who has "long focused on popular nonviolent struggle. ("Hard Feelings Test Hope in Israel-Hamas Deal" by Ethan Bronner, page A4).  In Bronner's upside-down journalism, Abbas, who just called a bunch of murderers "holy warriors," remains nevertheless an apostle of non-violence.

The Washington Post similarly covered up Abbas's "holy warrior" salute to his freed terrorists . And like the Times, it  vouched that Abbas remains the "leader of the more moderate Fatah."  ("In Swap for Shalit, Hamas sees victory" by Ernesto Londono" front page).

"Non-violent struggle" "more moderate Fatah" -- which is, of course, a bunch of hooey.  Still, what gives here, why would the Times and the Post so glaringly censor Abbas's "holy warrior" salute?  Because like most mainstream media, they are heavily invested in promoting a make-believe peace process and a make-believe Palestinian leader whom they peddle as a genuine, reliable peace partner.  The hard evidence belies their coverage, but if it gets in the way of their pro-Palestinian, anti-Israel agenda, out it goes.

There's an old adage that the truth will make you free.  At the Times and the Post, the conceit is that lies will. 

Leo Rennert is a former White House correspondent and Washington bureau chief of McClatchy Newspapers.

As Israel gained the freedom of abducted Sgt. Gilad Shalit and, in exchange, released hundreds of Palestinian prisoners, many of them with blood on their hands, Mahmoud Abbas, the president of the Palestinian Authority, addressed  many of his freed terrorists at a joyous celebration in Ramallah.

 "You are freedom fighters and holy warriors for the sake of God and the homeland," Abbas exulted ("Abbas greets released Palestinian prisoners" Haaretz, Oct. 18)

Abbas 's embrace of terrorist killers as "freedom fighters" and "holy warriors" is clear evidence of his support of terrorism as a path to advance Palestinian national objectives.  Also, his "holy warrior" salute wasn't just an isolated burst of enthusiasm at the return of the prisoners.  Under Abbas's leadership, PA TV, PA textbooks and even sermons by PA-appointed clerics have been part of a concerted campaign to glorify Palestinian terrorists and suicide bombers.  Abbas has named many public facilities and spaces after some of the most blood-soaked bombers and killers of Israeli civilians.

Yet, neither the New York Times nor the Washington Post, in their Oct. 19 editions, saw fit to report Abbas's bellicose address in Ramallah in their coverage of the release of Palestinian prisoners in exchange for Shalit. 

The Times not only omitted coverage of Abbas's speech at the Ramallah rally; it depicted Abbas as a leader who has "long focused on popular nonviolent struggle. ("Hard Feelings Test Hope in Israel-Hamas Deal" by Ethan Bronner, page A4).  In Bronner's upside-down journalism, Abbas, who just called a bunch of murderers "holy warriors," remains nevertheless an apostle of non-violence.

The Washington Post similarly covered up Abbas's "holy warrior" salute to his freed terrorists . And like the Times, it  vouched that Abbas remains the "leader of the more moderate Fatah."  ("In Swap for Shalit, Hamas sees victory" by Ernesto Londono" front page).

"Non-violent struggle" "more moderate Fatah" -- which is, of course, a bunch of hooey.  Still, what gives here, why would the Times and the Post so glaringly censor Abbas's "holy warrior" salute?  Because like most mainstream media, they are heavily invested in promoting a make-believe peace process and a make-believe Palestinian leader whom they peddle as a genuine, reliable peace partner.  The hard evidence belies their coverage, but if it gets in the way of their pro-Palestinian, anti-Israel agenda, out it goes.

There's an old adage that the truth will make you free.  At the Times and the Post, the conceit is that lies will. 

Leo Rennert is a former White House correspondent and Washington bureau chief of McClatchy Newspapers.