Let's hear it for another $60 billion infrastructure 'stimulus'

Rick Moran
All projects shovel ready, one would assume - or at least almost ready to be shovel ready:

The legislation would provide an immediate $50 billion investment in America's roads, bridges and airports, and transit systems and establish a $10 billion national infrastructure bank to leverage private and public capital for longer-term infrastructure projects.

"This legislation will create hundreds of thousands of construction jobs rebuilding our roads, bridges and infrastructure," said Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev.

The measure would be financed by a 0.7 percentage point surcharge on income over $1 million.

The announcement by Senate Democrats came the day after Republicans scuttled a pared-back jobs measure designed to boost hiring of teachers and first responders.

That plan failed on a 50-50 test vote that fell well short of the 60 needed to break a filibuster. Two Democrats abandoned Obama on the vote and two more who voted with the president said they couldn't support the underlying Obama plan unless it's changed.

Some Republicans are getting nervous, believing that voting down Obama's jobs bill piecemeal in this fashion will backfire with the public. I doubt it. The voters aren't buying it anymore after nearly a trillion spent on stimulus projects in 2009 and nothing really to show for it.

Obama has shot his wad on "stimulating" the economy with massive handouts to his labor allies. Another $60 billion in wasted money hasn't a chance of passing, nor will the public hold it against the GOP for opposing the plan.



All projects shovel ready, one would assume - or at least almost ready to be shovel ready:

The legislation would provide an immediate $50 billion investment in America's roads, bridges and airports, and transit systems and establish a $10 billion national infrastructure bank to leverage private and public capital for longer-term infrastructure projects.

"This legislation will create hundreds of thousands of construction jobs rebuilding our roads, bridges and infrastructure," said Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev.

The measure would be financed by a 0.7 percentage point surcharge on income over $1 million.

The announcement by Senate Democrats came the day after Republicans scuttled a pared-back jobs measure designed to boost hiring of teachers and first responders.

That plan failed on a 50-50 test vote that fell well short of the 60 needed to break a filibuster. Two Democrats abandoned Obama on the vote and two more who voted with the president said they couldn't support the underlying Obama plan unless it's changed.

Some Republicans are getting nervous, believing that voting down Obama's jobs bill piecemeal in this fashion will backfire with the public. I doubt it. The voters aren't buying it anymore after nearly a trillion spent on stimulus projects in 2009 and nothing really to show for it.

Obama has shot his wad on "stimulating" the economy with massive handouts to his labor allies. Another $60 billion in wasted money hasn't a chance of passing, nor will the public hold it against the GOP for opposing the plan.