Denmark passes 'fat tax'

Rick Moran
I have no doubt that the health nazis in this country would dearly love to imitate their brethren in Denmark.

AFP:


The new tax, designed by Denmark?s outgoing government as a health issue to limit the population?s intake of fatty foods, will add 16 kroner ($2.87, 2.15 euros) per kilo (2.2 pounds) of saturated fats in a product.

This means an increase in the price of a pack of 250 grammes of butter, for example, by 2.20 kroner to more than 18 kroner.

"It has been a chaotic week with a lot of empty shelves. People have been filling their freezers," Christian Jensen of an independent local Copenhagen supermarket told AFP.

"But actually I don?t think the tax will make that much difference. If people want to buy a cake, they will buy it. But right now they?re saving money," he added.

The new tax will be levied on all products including saturated fats -- from butter and milk to pizzas, oils, meats and pre-cooked foods -- in a costing system that Denmark?s Confederation of Industries (DI) says is a bureaucratic nightmare for producers and outlets.

"The way that this has been put together is an administrative nightmare, and I doubt whether it will give better health. It?s more just a tax," DI foodstuffs spokeswoman Gitte Hestehave told AFP, adding that the costs of levying the tax would be passed on to consumers.

This is an extremely regressive tax that will be felt far more by the working class and middle class than the rich. And, of course, as the DI foodstuffs spokesperson says, it won't reduce fat intake by enough to make much of a difference. People will eat what they eat regardless of what the health nazis demand.

Coming soon to America, no doubt.


I have no doubt that the health nazis in this country would dearly love to imitate their brethren in Denmark.

AFP:


The new tax, designed by Denmark?s outgoing government as a health issue to limit the population?s intake of fatty foods, will add 16 kroner ($2.87, 2.15 euros) per kilo (2.2 pounds) of saturated fats in a product.

This means an increase in the price of a pack of 250 grammes of butter, for example, by 2.20 kroner to more than 18 kroner.

"It has been a chaotic week with a lot of empty shelves. People have been filling their freezers," Christian Jensen of an independent local Copenhagen supermarket told AFP.

"But actually I don?t think the tax will make that much difference. If people want to buy a cake, they will buy it. But right now they?re saving money," he added.

The new tax will be levied on all products including saturated fats -- from butter and milk to pizzas, oils, meats and pre-cooked foods -- in a costing system that Denmark?s Confederation of Industries (DI) says is a bureaucratic nightmare for producers and outlets.

"The way that this has been put together is an administrative nightmare, and I doubt whether it will give better health. It?s more just a tax," DI foodstuffs spokeswoman Gitte Hestehave told AFP, adding that the costs of levying the tax would be passed on to consumers.

This is an extremely regressive tax that will be felt far more by the working class and middle class than the rich. And, of course, as the DI foodstuffs spokesperson says, it won't reduce fat intake by enough to make much of a difference. People will eat what they eat regardless of what the health nazis demand.

Coming soon to America, no doubt.