Cain gets the 'simple' label from the Washington Post

J. Robert Smith

Oh, no.  Looks like the Washington Post has put the Reagan curse on Herman Cain.  In the lead story in the Post's Friday electronic edition, Post reporter Sandhya Somashekhar characterizes Cain's positions as "simple."  For the smart set - those sophisticates who see nothing but gradations of gray - simple just means "simplistic."  How many times was the great Ronald Reagan pasted with the "simple" label by liberal and Republican establishment detractors?

Now it's Cain's turn to be Reagan-simple.  That should buck up Cain considerably.  The Washington Post and New York Times don't give front-page, lead story billing to candidates who they think are marginal.  So simple Herman Cain must be registering with the big complex brains at the Post more than his current good polling suggests. 

Somashekhar opines - err, reports:

And that has prompted questions about what else he stands for and whether he has the breadth of knowledge -- particularly on foreign policy -- expected of an occupant of the White House.

Now who was Somashekhar referring to, Reagan or Cain?  It seems the smart set has a penchant for regurgitating tired old arguments.

But in Somashekhar's very next paragraph, readers get to the heart of what makes Cain - and Reagan before him - a simpleton.

An examination of Cain's words -- his remarks as a radio talk-show host, as well as his writings, interviews and speeches -- shows a man thoroughly steeped in conservative ideology. He has said that climate change is a scam, that he would not have survived cancer under the Obama administration's health-care overhaul, and that the United States is on the brink of a socialist takeover.  [Italics added]

Indeed.  To the pedigreed folk at the Post, it's conservatism that's simplistic.  A man like Herman Cain or Ronald Reagan, who has conservative convictions, and who actually believes that climate change is hooey (Reagan would have concurred) or that government-run health care degrades the quality of care for patients or who thinks that a resolute show of strength is what's required to stand-down the Iranians, is just hayseed dumb.

Barack Obama, of course, is the sort of  in-the-weeds leader the Post's Best and Brightest prefer, because getting in the weeds can lead to only one conclusion: a complex world requires answers that only complex liberalism can arrive at - just like leftism and liberalism are doing today, across Europe and right here in the U.S. of A.  But having the left lead us to the verge of economic collapse and calamity just goes to show how complex things really are, and how it takes time for complex left-doctrine to work through all the... complexity.     

As Led Zeppelin lead singer Robert Plant once crooned, "The Song Remains the Same."  For liberals and snobby RINOs the same song means tagging true conservatives as lightweights. 

Keep being simple, Herman.  Beat Romney.  Bury Barack Obama in a landslide.  And then act on all those simple conservative ideas and positions.  Make America great again. 

Oh, no.  Looks like the Washington Post has put the Reagan curse on Herman Cain.  In the lead story in the Post's Friday electronic edition, Post reporter Sandhya Somashekhar characterizes Cain's positions as "simple."  For the smart set - those sophisticates who see nothing but gradations of gray - simple just means "simplistic."  How many times was the great Ronald Reagan pasted with the "simple" label by liberal and Republican establishment detractors?

Now it's Cain's turn to be Reagan-simple.  That should buck up Cain considerably.  The Washington Post and New York Times don't give front-page, lead story billing to candidates who they think are marginal.  So simple Herman Cain must be registering with the big complex brains at the Post more than his current good polling suggests. 

Somashekhar opines - err, reports:

And that has prompted questions about what else he stands for and whether he has the breadth of knowledge -- particularly on foreign policy -- expected of an occupant of the White House.

Now who was Somashekhar referring to, Reagan or Cain?  It seems the smart set has a penchant for regurgitating tired old arguments.

But in Somashekhar's very next paragraph, readers get to the heart of what makes Cain - and Reagan before him - a simpleton.

An examination of Cain's words -- his remarks as a radio talk-show host, as well as his writings, interviews and speeches -- shows a man thoroughly steeped in conservative ideology. He has said that climate change is a scam, that he would not have survived cancer under the Obama administration's health-care overhaul, and that the United States is on the brink of a socialist takeover.  [Italics added]

Indeed.  To the pedigreed folk at the Post, it's conservatism that's simplistic.  A man like Herman Cain or Ronald Reagan, who has conservative convictions, and who actually believes that climate change is hooey (Reagan would have concurred) or that government-run health care degrades the quality of care for patients or who thinks that a resolute show of strength is what's required to stand-down the Iranians, is just hayseed dumb.

Barack Obama, of course, is the sort of  in-the-weeds leader the Post's Best and Brightest prefer, because getting in the weeds can lead to only one conclusion: a complex world requires answers that only complex liberalism can arrive at - just like leftism and liberalism are doing today, across Europe and right here in the U.S. of A.  But having the left lead us to the verge of economic collapse and calamity just goes to show how complex things really are, and how it takes time for complex left-doctrine to work through all the... complexity.     

As Led Zeppelin lead singer Robert Plant once crooned, "The Song Remains the Same."  For liberals and snobby RINOs the same song means tagging true conservatives as lightweights. 

Keep being simple, Herman.  Beat Romney.  Bury Barack Obama in a landslide.  And then act on all those simple conservative ideas and positions.  Make America great again.