Organizing a 'Barbarian' Boycott

Everyone knows that in life there are some situations where you're "damned if you do and damned if you don't." Either way, in the eyes of liberals, Republicans are always damned.  Such is the case with Obama's address to a joint session of Congress. Seems that "Several lawmakers are still determining whether it is worth their time to stay in Washington to hear the President, and some are already planning [to] skip it."

Why should Republicans go to a jobs speech by a President who clearly blames them for an unemployment situation he's compounded?  As it relates to labor, jobs, labor unions and Labor Day, Barack Obama, who prides himself on civility and measured tones, has yet to ask his vice president to retract his "barbarians at the gate" statement or rebuke Jimmy Hoffa Jr. for his combative, over-the-top remarks.

Now he expects to woo the "barbarians" into the arena, where he has plans to publicly humiliate them a la the 2010 State of the Union address, where Supreme Court justice Sam Alito could not help mouthing the words "Not true" in response to the president attempting to publicly shame him over a ruling on campaign advertising.

If Republicans go, they're fools.

Moreover, being threatened by the likes of Teamsters General President Jimmy Hoffa Jr. should have every Republican who plans to attend Obama's job-creation speech -- especially those in the Tea Party caucus -- checking under their seats and straining to keep a watchful eye on the back door.

In fact, if Republicans had any backbone they'd demand that Obama rebuke Hoffa for his uncivil language when he said, "President Obama, this is your army. We are ready to march. Everybody here has got a vote. If we go back, keep your eye on the prize... let's take these son of bitches [sic] out and give America back (inaudible) America where we belong."

So far, there's been silence from the civility-minded President who, at the emotional "Together We Thrive" Tucson Memorial, at the "rebuttal of Republicans and Tea Party activists" at the University of Michigan, and at the "civility is not a sign of weakness" 2010 National Prayer Breakfast, demanded softer tones from all Americans, especially those who are critical of him. 

If the Labor Day rally was any indication of the direction the joint session job creation speech may take in framing the Republicans as the reason for 9.1% unemployment, the right side of the aisle had best stay clear of the halls of Congress.

What a powerful statement it would be if right-leaning politicians publicly declared that until the President disavows Mr. Hoffa's crude, inflammatory rhetoric; announces that he disagrees with the 'take these sons-of-bitches out' language; and stipulates that the Teamster president owes a large group of American citizens an apology, not one Republican lawmaker should set foot in the House of Representatives.

Paul Broun (R-GA) is one such Republican congressman who won't be attending. Broun has made it a tradition to post his retorts to Obama's remarks on Twitter.  Paul Broun plans to watch the long-anticipated speech from across the street in his office where he can scream at the flat-screen and, if he so chooses, blow a kazoo every time Obama floats a falsehood.

The Congressman's Twitter practice is a safer, less controversial way to express Joe Wilson (R-SC)-style "You lie!" responses without becoming a whipping boy after telling the truth. Instead of shouting it out, Broun can tweet it out similar to how, during the State of the Union address, he tweeted "Mr. President, you don't believe in the Constitution. You believe in socialism."

Last week Joe Walsh (R-IL) also announced that he would not be among those in attendance.  What's Joe's excuse for playing hooky?  Walsh, who obviously has a realistic sense of what goes on when Obama takes to the plinth, said on Twitter that he "didn't want to act as a 'prop' for Obama's speech."  Wise thinking, Joe.

What Joe should do now is expand on that tweet and recommend to Republican colleagues that a Hoffa Jr./barbarian boycott is definitely called for. 

If he did, Mr. Walsh would be encouraging Republican legislators to freely and peaceably assemble themselves somewhere besides the job creation joint session.  In doing so, and in response to rude language directed toward the Republicans at a Labor Day rally, the esteemed Congressman would be organizing a peaceful protest directed toward the President's constituents and, for his failure to repudiate Hoffa and Biden's abusive comments.

A Republican joint session no-show isn't impossible.  Every day the Republican Refusenik movement appears to be growing. Senator Jim DeMint (R-SC), member of the Senate Tea Party Caucus, said that he "probably" wouldn't show up either.  Way to go, Jim!

Senator DeMint said that if Obama had "sent a written proposal over first, I would go hear him explain it, but frankly right now I'm so frustrated I don't think I'm going to go. I can't imagine too many Americans wanting to hear another speech with no real plan attached." 

Except of course for the President, who loves to hear himself read, and because that's where he gets to learn what it is he believes.

Nevertheless, President Obama's lack of condemnation for Hoffa's statement to "take out" those who disagree with failed job policies, union thuggery, and additional stimulus masquerading as job creation is a perfect excuse to justify a mass Republican protest.

On the other hand, what a perfect opportunity to band together and make a statement, because rest assured, Republicans will be publicly "damned" by Obama if they do show up.  So, how about all of them attending?  Then mid-speech, like the "barbarians" Biden says they are, the Republicans could stand up, head for the door, and save Jimmy Hoffa Jr. the trouble by voluntarily "taking themselves out."

Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com

Thomas Lifson adds:

As emotionally satisfying as this plan might seem, I believe it would be a strategic mistake. Obama would be able to claim that the GOP refuses to work together, and insults the American people by boycotting a plan to save the economy. "They won't even listen," he could say.  The media would relentlessly pound this theme. It would be much better to let Obama's speech flop, as it is likely to do.

Everyone knows that in life there are some situations where you're "damned if you do and damned if you don't." Either way, in the eyes of liberals, Republicans are always damned.  Such is the case with Obama's address to a joint session of Congress. Seems that "Several lawmakers are still determining whether it is worth their time to stay in Washington to hear the President, and some are already planning [to] skip it."

Why should Republicans go to a jobs speech by a President who clearly blames them for an unemployment situation he's compounded?  As it relates to labor, jobs, labor unions and Labor Day, Barack Obama, who prides himself on civility and measured tones, has yet to ask his vice president to retract his "barbarians at the gate" statement or rebuke Jimmy Hoffa Jr. for his combative, over-the-top remarks.

Now he expects to woo the "barbarians" into the arena, where he has plans to publicly humiliate them a la the 2010 State of the Union address, where Supreme Court justice Sam Alito could not help mouthing the words "Not true" in response to the president attempting to publicly shame him over a ruling on campaign advertising.

If Republicans go, they're fools.

Moreover, being threatened by the likes of Teamsters General President Jimmy Hoffa Jr. should have every Republican who plans to attend Obama's job-creation speech -- especially those in the Tea Party caucus -- checking under their seats and straining to keep a watchful eye on the back door.

In fact, if Republicans had any backbone they'd demand that Obama rebuke Hoffa for his uncivil language when he said, "President Obama, this is your army. We are ready to march. Everybody here has got a vote. If we go back, keep your eye on the prize... let's take these son of bitches [sic] out and give America back (inaudible) America where we belong."

So far, there's been silence from the civility-minded President who, at the emotional "Together We Thrive" Tucson Memorial, at the "rebuttal of Republicans and Tea Party activists" at the University of Michigan, and at the "civility is not a sign of weakness" 2010 National Prayer Breakfast, demanded softer tones from all Americans, especially those who are critical of him. 

If the Labor Day rally was any indication of the direction the joint session job creation speech may take in framing the Republicans as the reason for 9.1% unemployment, the right side of the aisle had best stay clear of the halls of Congress.

What a powerful statement it would be if right-leaning politicians publicly declared that until the President disavows Mr. Hoffa's crude, inflammatory rhetoric; announces that he disagrees with the 'take these sons-of-bitches out' language; and stipulates that the Teamster president owes a large group of American citizens an apology, not one Republican lawmaker should set foot in the House of Representatives.

Paul Broun (R-GA) is one such Republican congressman who won't be attending. Broun has made it a tradition to post his retorts to Obama's remarks on Twitter.  Paul Broun plans to watch the long-anticipated speech from across the street in his office where he can scream at the flat-screen and, if he so chooses, blow a kazoo every time Obama floats a falsehood.

The Congressman's Twitter practice is a safer, less controversial way to express Joe Wilson (R-SC)-style "You lie!" responses without becoming a whipping boy after telling the truth. Instead of shouting it out, Broun can tweet it out similar to how, during the State of the Union address, he tweeted "Mr. President, you don't believe in the Constitution. You believe in socialism."

Last week Joe Walsh (R-IL) also announced that he would not be among those in attendance.  What's Joe's excuse for playing hooky?  Walsh, who obviously has a realistic sense of what goes on when Obama takes to the plinth, said on Twitter that he "didn't want to act as a 'prop' for Obama's speech."  Wise thinking, Joe.

What Joe should do now is expand on that tweet and recommend to Republican colleagues that a Hoffa Jr./barbarian boycott is definitely called for. 

If he did, Mr. Walsh would be encouraging Republican legislators to freely and peaceably assemble themselves somewhere besides the job creation joint session.  In doing so, and in response to rude language directed toward the Republicans at a Labor Day rally, the esteemed Congressman would be organizing a peaceful protest directed toward the President's constituents and, for his failure to repudiate Hoffa and Biden's abusive comments.

A Republican joint session no-show isn't impossible.  Every day the Republican Refusenik movement appears to be growing. Senator Jim DeMint (R-SC), member of the Senate Tea Party Caucus, said that he "probably" wouldn't show up either.  Way to go, Jim!

Senator DeMint said that if Obama had "sent a written proposal over first, I would go hear him explain it, but frankly right now I'm so frustrated I don't think I'm going to go. I can't imagine too many Americans wanting to hear another speech with no real plan attached." 

Except of course for the President, who loves to hear himself read, and because that's where he gets to learn what it is he believes.

Nevertheless, President Obama's lack of condemnation for Hoffa's statement to "take out" those who disagree with failed job policies, union thuggery, and additional stimulus masquerading as job creation is a perfect excuse to justify a mass Republican protest.

On the other hand, what a perfect opportunity to band together and make a statement, because rest assured, Republicans will be publicly "damned" by Obama if they do show up.  So, how about all of them attending?  Then mid-speech, like the "barbarians" Biden says they are, the Republicans could stand up, head for the door, and save Jimmy Hoffa Jr. the trouble by voluntarily "taking themselves out."

Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com

Thomas Lifson adds:

As emotionally satisfying as this plan might seem, I believe it would be a strategic mistake. Obama would be able to claim that the GOP refuses to work together, and insults the American people by boycotting a plan to save the economy. "They won't even listen," he could say.  The media would relentlessly pound this theme. It would be much better to let Obama's speech flop, as it is likely to do.

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