Not just a recession, stagnation

John Tsarpalas
One of the outcomes of this protracted recession is a lack of mobility for the average worker. We all know it is harder to find a job, but even once that job is procured, what about advancement? The lack of growth and expansion of most small businesses leaves little room for advancement, not to mention that people are afraid to change jobs or retire early.

Say that your son or daughter graduated from college a year ago, and they finally get an entry level position; five years later they are still doing the same job. Yes they are one of the lucky ones to get a job but how happy are they?  How's their "hope and change" now?  The bigger question is how do we reach these 22 year olds with the message that real hope stems from free markets and capitalism? How do we get them to realize that they are unemployed or trapped in dead-end jobs because of government programs like Fannie Mae, the burden and uncertainty of ObamaCare and the progressives' anti-capitalist agenda? 

With the liberal bias of the old media, and academia's disdain for free-markets and complete disregard of historical facts, how does the millennial generation come to understand the solution to their professional and economic depression? The answer is the individual taking the initiative to communicate to their kids, friends, neighbors and relatives whenever possible. That means conversation at dinner tables or at the local supermarket. It means texting and forwarding emails to those you don't usually think of.  It means writing letters to the editor or commenting on blogs.  It means becoming a Wikipedian and making sure that Wikipedia provides balanced information.  It means running for local school board.  It means complaining to your university's alumni association about the lack of balance on campus, and then only donating when they can show that your funds do not support tenured leftist professors.

It means not letting a liberal point of view go un-challenged. It means inviting someone who you know but never approached to the next Tea Party meeting or a candidate night. What it really means is getting outside of your comfort zone and speaking up.  We are not going to save our country, (literally the world) without taking some personal risk.

 It needs to be said with sincerity, not with anger, in as many venues and formats as possible. It is up to you to do something! I have already started.

John Tsarpalas is the former Executive Director of the Illinois Republican Party and President of the Sam Adams Alliance. He currently serves as the principal of Tsarpolitics, a candidate and campaign coaching organization. Learn more at www.tsarpolitics.com.

One of the outcomes of this protracted recession is a lack of mobility for the average worker. We all know it is harder to find a job, but even once that job is procured, what about advancement? The lack of growth and expansion of most small businesses leaves little room for advancement, not to mention that people are afraid to change jobs or retire early.

Say that your son or daughter graduated from college a year ago, and they finally get an entry level position; five years later they are still doing the same job. Yes they are one of the lucky ones to get a job but how happy are they?  How's their "hope and change" now?  The bigger question is how do we reach these 22 year olds with the message that real hope stems from free markets and capitalism? How do we get them to realize that they are unemployed or trapped in dead-end jobs because of government programs like Fannie Mae, the burden and uncertainty of ObamaCare and the progressives' anti-capitalist agenda? 

With the liberal bias of the old media, and academia's disdain for free-markets and complete disregard of historical facts, how does the millennial generation come to understand the solution to their professional and economic depression? The answer is the individual taking the initiative to communicate to their kids, friends, neighbors and relatives whenever possible. That means conversation at dinner tables or at the local supermarket. It means texting and forwarding emails to those you don't usually think of.  It means writing letters to the editor or commenting on blogs.  It means becoming a Wikipedian and making sure that Wikipedia provides balanced information.  It means running for local school board.  It means complaining to your university's alumni association about the lack of balance on campus, and then only donating when they can show that your funds do not support tenured leftist professors.

It means not letting a liberal point of view go un-challenged. It means inviting someone who you know but never approached to the next Tea Party meeting or a candidate night. What it really means is getting outside of your comfort zone and speaking up.  We are not going to save our country, (literally the world) without taking some personal risk.

 It needs to be said with sincerity, not with anger, in as many venues and formats as possible. It is up to you to do something! I have already started.

John Tsarpalas is the former Executive Director of the Illinois Republican Party and President of the Sam Adams Alliance. He currently serves as the principal of Tsarpolitics, a candidate and campaign coaching organization. Learn more at www.tsarpolitics.com.