Turkey abandoning Assad

Rick Moran
Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan's government was one of the few that did not come out and condemn President Assad for his brutal crackdown on protestors. The tone employed by Turkey - up until now - was decidedly less frosty than any other nation except perhaps Iran.

That appears about to change as Turkey now says they have "lost confidence" in the Syrian regime:

Turkey said Sunday it had lost confidence in the regime in Syria after months of trying to broker an end to the bloodshed there and warned it could become the Arab Spring's next casualty.

"Actually (the situation in Syria) has reached a level that everything is too little, too late. We lost our confidence," Turkish President Abdullah Gul said.

"Everyone should know that we are with the Syrian people... What is fundamental is the people," he was quoted as saying by the Anatolia news agency.

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan echoed his president's comments with a warning that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's regime could become the latest one to tumble in a string of revolts across the Arab world.

"A regime cannot survive by force, brutality, by shooting and killing unarmed people taking to the streets. The only solution is to silence arms immediately and listen to the demands of the people," Erdogan said in a televised address to the nation.

"We saw the end of those who did not choose this way in Tunis and Egypt, and now we observe with sorrow what is being lived in Libya," Erdogan said, stopping just short of calling for his departure.

Erdogan made a similar call to authorities in Yemen.

Can Assad survive total isolation? He can for a while, certainly. But eventually, as in other revolts we've seen, a turning point arrives and things can go downhill very rapidly afterward. What that turning point might be is unknown, but with there being no sign the population is losing courage about facing down live ammunition for Assad's thugs, it will no doubt come sooner rather than later.



Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan's government was one of the few that did not come out and condemn President Assad for his brutal crackdown on protestors. The tone employed by Turkey - up until now - was decidedly less frosty than any other nation except perhaps Iran.

That appears about to change as Turkey now says they have "lost confidence" in the Syrian regime:

Turkey said Sunday it had lost confidence in the regime in Syria after months of trying to broker an end to the bloodshed there and warned it could become the Arab Spring's next casualty.

"Actually (the situation in Syria) has reached a level that everything is too little, too late. We lost our confidence," Turkish President Abdullah Gul said.

"Everyone should know that we are with the Syrian people... What is fundamental is the people," he was quoted as saying by the Anatolia news agency.

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan echoed his president's comments with a warning that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's regime could become the latest one to tumble in a string of revolts across the Arab world.

"A regime cannot survive by force, brutality, by shooting and killing unarmed people taking to the streets. The only solution is to silence arms immediately and listen to the demands of the people," Erdogan said in a televised address to the nation.

"We saw the end of those who did not choose this way in Tunis and Egypt, and now we observe with sorrow what is being lived in Libya," Erdogan said, stopping just short of calling for his departure.

Erdogan made a similar call to authorities in Yemen.

Can Assad survive total isolation? He can for a while, certainly. But eventually, as in other revolts we've seen, a turning point arrives and things can go downhill very rapidly afterward. What that turning point might be is unknown, but with there being no sign the population is losing courage about facing down live ammunition for Assad's thugs, it will no doubt come sooner rather than later.