On the hunt for Gaddafi

Rick Moran
With a $1.3 million bounty on his head - dead or alive - and amnesty promised to any of his inner circle who betray his whereabouts, Muamar Gaddafi's days are probably numbered.

But where to start looking? His hometown of Sirte is a possibility. He has very strong tribal and clan ties there. But the National Transitional Council (NTC) who is already setting up shop in Tripoli has made a deal with tribal elders in Sirte that they won't be attacked if they don't harbor their tribesman.

Some believe he's not even in Libya anymore. He may have taken refuge in Sudan, where he would be most welcome by Sudan leader and fellow war crimes suspect Omar al-Bashir. Others speculate me might be in one of the deep bunkers in Tripoli.

Wherever he is, the British SAS is on his trail:

For the first time, defence sources have confirmed that the SAS has been in Libya for several weeks, and played a key role in coordinating the fall of Tripoli.

With the majority of the capital now in rebel hands, the SAS soldiers, who have been dressed in Arab civilian clothing and carrying the same weapons as the rebels, have been ordered to switch their focus to the search for Gaddafi, who has been on the run since his fortified headquarters was captured on Tuesday.

Libya's National Transitional Council (NTC) said Gaddafi was wanted "dead or alive" and promised an amnesty to any of his inner circle prepared to betray his whereabouts.

Nato still has no idea where the despot is holed up, and on Wednesday he taunted his opponents by claiming in a television interview that he had secretly toured the streets of Tripoli without being spotted.

Even if Gaddafi is captured, there will likely be a prolonged period of violence. The factions in the NTC don't like each other very much and the Islamists - who did most of the fighting - will no doubt want a sizable power sharing agreement. They will not take being shunted to the sidelines without a fight.

There will be a hard road ahead for Libya no matter what happens to Gaddafi.



With a $1.3 million bounty on his head - dead or alive - and amnesty promised to any of his inner circle who betray his whereabouts, Muamar Gaddafi's days are probably numbered.

But where to start looking? His hometown of Sirte is a possibility. He has very strong tribal and clan ties there. But the National Transitional Council (NTC) who is already setting up shop in Tripoli has made a deal with tribal elders in Sirte that they won't be attacked if they don't harbor their tribesman.

Some believe he's not even in Libya anymore. He may have taken refuge in Sudan, where he would be most welcome by Sudan leader and fellow war crimes suspect Omar al-Bashir. Others speculate me might be in one of the deep bunkers in Tripoli.

Wherever he is, the British SAS is on his trail:

For the first time, defence sources have confirmed that the SAS has been in Libya for several weeks, and played a key role in coordinating the fall of Tripoli.

With the majority of the capital now in rebel hands, the SAS soldiers, who have been dressed in Arab civilian clothing and carrying the same weapons as the rebels, have been ordered to switch their focus to the search for Gaddafi, who has been on the run since his fortified headquarters was captured on Tuesday.

Libya's National Transitional Council (NTC) said Gaddafi was wanted "dead or alive" and promised an amnesty to any of his inner circle prepared to betray his whereabouts.

Nato still has no idea where the despot is holed up, and on Wednesday he taunted his opponents by claiming in a television interview that he had secretly toured the streets of Tripoli without being spotted.

Even if Gaddafi is captured, there will likely be a prolonged period of violence. The factions in the NTC don't like each other very much and the Islamists - who did most of the fighting - will no doubt want a sizable power sharing agreement. They will not take being shunted to the sidelines without a fight.

There will be a hard road ahead for Libya no matter what happens to Gaddafi.