Obama firearms boom continues

Rosslyn Smith
There is one American industry that has done very well during the Obama administration, probably to his acute dismay.  In 2009 we read about the tremendous increase in demand for firearms following the election.  After slackening a bit in 2010, the demand for guns is once again on the rise.  Shooting Industry Magazine recently reported:

The firearms industry is enjoying brisk-to-robust firearm sales during a time when much of the U.S. economy continues to suffer.

In April, dealers reported firearms sales that matched and even exceeded those of the six months following the 2008 national elections.

In May, the number of NSSF-adjusted NICS background checks reflects an 11.4-percent increase over May 2010. The positive May report is in stark contrast to news of the nation's economy, which hit another slowdown during the month.

NSSF reports that its adjusted NICS data shows increases for 2011, compared to 2010, of January: 9.7 percent; February: 13.6 percent; March: 15 percent; and April: 15.2 percent. NSSF also indicates that for 12 straight months, beginning in May 2010, there have been increases in the number of background checks.

The NICS data, even when adjusted by NSSF to eliminate certain purpose codes (see below), does not reflect actual firearm sales, yet it is the best indicator of monthly consumer activity.

This report makes me suspect that should the urban rabble in America attempt what recently happened in Great Britain it may not end well for many of them.  In Great Britain the government has a longstanding policy of depriving their law abiding citizens of defensive weapons of all kinds.   In many parts of America it is hard to pick a soft target with any degree of certainty.   Is that bulge in the pocket of that wheezy old gent a new pack of Marlboros or is it one of the recent generation of .380 ACP polymer pocket pistols developed for the growing concealed carry market?  

There is one American industry that has done very well during the Obama administration, probably to his acute dismay.  In 2009 we read about the tremendous increase in demand for firearms following the election.  After slackening a bit in 2010, the demand for guns is once again on the rise.  Shooting Industry Magazine recently reported:

The firearms industry is enjoying brisk-to-robust firearm sales during a time when much of the U.S. economy continues to suffer.

In April, dealers reported firearms sales that matched and even exceeded those of the six months following the 2008 national elections.

In May, the number of NSSF-adjusted NICS background checks reflects an 11.4-percent increase over May 2010. The positive May report is in stark contrast to news of the nation's economy, which hit another slowdown during the month.

NSSF reports that its adjusted NICS data shows increases for 2011, compared to 2010, of January: 9.7 percent; February: 13.6 percent; March: 15 percent; and April: 15.2 percent. NSSF also indicates that for 12 straight months, beginning in May 2010, there have been increases in the number of background checks.

The NICS data, even when adjusted by NSSF to eliminate certain purpose codes (see below), does not reflect actual firearm sales, yet it is the best indicator of monthly consumer activity.

This report makes me suspect that should the urban rabble in America attempt what recently happened in Great Britain it may not end well for many of them.  In Great Britain the government has a longstanding policy of depriving their law abiding citizens of defensive weapons of all kinds.   In many parts of America it is hard to pick a soft target with any degree of certainty.   Is that bulge in the pocket of that wheezy old gent a new pack of Marlboros or is it one of the recent generation of .380 ACP polymer pocket pistols developed for the growing concealed carry market?