The Deportation Busing Argument

Richard Butrick
George Will on ABC's "This Week" (Sunday) succinctly stated the "Busing Argument." It  would take a line of buses "bumper-to-bumper extending from San Diego to Alaska" to deport 11 million illegals.  Ok.  That is absurd.  Deportation? Forget it.  Can't work.

The insidious aspect to the busing argument is that it is used to launch unimplied alternatives. Bus them all at once or give up altogether on the idea of busing. Can't get rid of the problem by busing therefore live with it and grant some sort of amnesty. Can't get rid of the problem by forced busing therefore force is not the answer.  Had GW followed up with the observation that other forms of force and inducements are called for, there would be no argument here.  Strange that the busing argument has traction as when it is transported to other venues it is obviously vapid.  Can't solve the drug abuse problem by drug interdiction therefore drug interdiction is stupid.

How about just bending the curve?  Institutionalizing a policy that reduces the net balance of illegals by even 100k a year would get the ball rolling in the right direction.  As it is, deportation is already the policy (not properly enforced) for illegals that get into trouble with the law.  Laws by themselves don't eliminate crime. Laws have to be enforced.  Enforcing immigration laws already on the books would go a long way toward bending the curve. Additional laws eliminating anchor babies would also go a long way. Nothing new here. A 2005 study by the Center for Immigration Studies advocates a policy of attrition and points out the fallacy of the all-or-nothing trap that ensnares even "conservative" commentators like GW who claim that all-won't-work so some form of amnesty is the only alternative. You can't get rid of all the criminals all at once therefore some form of amnesty must be granted?

Regan granted amnesty to 3 millions illegals.  Now the same argument is being used with 11 million.  Is there a pattern here?  Of course any sort of policy that bends the illegal curve will be deemed anti-immigrant or racist.  If you can't live with that then sink with the alternative.

George Will on ABC's "This Week" (Sunday) succinctly stated the "Busing Argument." It  would take a line of buses "bumper-to-bumper extending from San Diego to Alaska" to deport 11 million illegals.  Ok.  That is absurd.  Deportation? Forget it.  Can't work.

The insidious aspect to the busing argument is that it is used to launch unimplied alternatives. Bus them all at once or give up altogether on the idea of busing. Can't get rid of the problem by busing therefore live with it and grant some sort of amnesty. Can't get rid of the problem by forced busing therefore force is not the answer.  Had GW followed up with the observation that other forms of force and inducements are called for, there would be no argument here.  Strange that the busing argument has traction as when it is transported to other venues it is obviously vapid.  Can't solve the drug abuse problem by drug interdiction therefore drug interdiction is stupid.

How about just bending the curve?  Institutionalizing a policy that reduces the net balance of illegals by even 100k a year would get the ball rolling in the right direction.  As it is, deportation is already the policy (not properly enforced) for illegals that get into trouble with the law.  Laws by themselves don't eliminate crime. Laws have to be enforced.  Enforcing immigration laws already on the books would go a long way toward bending the curve. Additional laws eliminating anchor babies would also go a long way. Nothing new here. A 2005 study by the Center for Immigration Studies advocates a policy of attrition and points out the fallacy of the all-or-nothing trap that ensnares even "conservative" commentators like GW who claim that all-won't-work so some form of amnesty is the only alternative. You can't get rid of all the criminals all at once therefore some form of amnesty must be granted?

Regan granted amnesty to 3 millions illegals.  Now the same argument is being used with 11 million.  Is there a pattern here?  Of course any sort of policy that bends the illegal curve will be deemed anti-immigrant or racist.  If you can't live with that then sink with the alternative.