Palestinians give up on full statehood; seek General Assembly recognition at UN

Rick Moran
This doesn't change much of anything. After all, declaring a fictitious place real never works.

Haaretz:

Palestinian sources and European diplomats said that Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas and his aides are increasingly leaning toward a direct appeal to the General Assembly of the international organization. Even though the assembly lacks the authority to offer the Palestinians full UN membership, at the General Assembly the United States is unable to use its veto power against resolutions brought before the plenum for a vote.

Also, the Palestinians would like the vote to take place during the General Assembly in the last week of September, and for this there is no need for a great deal of preparation. The vote at the General Assembly could be called with as little as 24 hours notice.

A vote at the General Assembly is expected to end with a Palestinian victory and a large majority, as some 140 member states are expected to support recognition of a Palestinian state. Even though a General Assembly resolution is "weaker" than one by the Security Council, the Palestinians are comparing such a decision to Resolution 181 of November 29, 1947, in which the General Assembly approved the plan to partition Palestine.

Senior Palestinian officials say that without the decision on dividing Palestine in 1947, Israel would not have had the international legitimacy to declare independence in May 1948.

If the UN can invent countries where none exist, think of the possibilities. Perhaps the Big Rock Candy Mountain could petition the General Assembly for statehood recognition. Maybe the Wizard of Oz would like all those perks that go with nationhood like not having to pay parking tickets and enjoying diplomatic immunity if your kid is a drug dealer.

Simply declaring something is real doesn't make it such. The Palestinians and their allies are simply engaging in wisful thinking.



This doesn't change much of anything. After all, declaring a fictitious place real never works.

Haaretz:

Palestinian sources and European diplomats said that Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas and his aides are increasingly leaning toward a direct appeal to the General Assembly of the international organization. Even though the assembly lacks the authority to offer the Palestinians full UN membership, at the General Assembly the United States is unable to use its veto power against resolutions brought before the plenum for a vote.

Also, the Palestinians would like the vote to take place during the General Assembly in the last week of September, and for this there is no need for a great deal of preparation. The vote at the General Assembly could be called with as little as 24 hours notice.

A vote at the General Assembly is expected to end with a Palestinian victory and a large majority, as some 140 member states are expected to support recognition of a Palestinian state. Even though a General Assembly resolution is "weaker" than one by the Security Council, the Palestinians are comparing such a decision to Resolution 181 of November 29, 1947, in which the General Assembly approved the plan to partition Palestine.

Senior Palestinian officials say that without the decision on dividing Palestine in 1947, Israel would not have had the international legitimacy to declare independence in May 1948.

If the UN can invent countries where none exist, think of the possibilities. Perhaps the Big Rock Candy Mountain could petition the General Assembly for statehood recognition. Maybe the Wizard of Oz would like all those perks that go with nationhood like not having to pay parking tickets and enjoying diplomatic immunity if your kid is a drug dealer.

Simply declaring something is real doesn't make it such. The Palestinians and their allies are simply engaging in wisful thinking.